The White House has pulled the plug on former MBTA chief Beverly Scott's nomination to serve on a national transportation board.

Scott resigned as general manager of the MBTA last winter, announcing her plans to step down as the transit authority was coping with snow and cold-induced service failures.

Related: MBTA GM Bev Scott is resigning

The White House press office announced around 7 p.m. Monday that Scott's nomination to serve on the National Transportation Safety Board had been withdrawn.

From 2007 to 2012, Scott was CEO and general manager of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority and she worked from 2002 to 2007 as chief executive officer and general manager of the Sacramento Regional Transit District.

President Barack Obama on July 30 nominated Scott to fill a term running through Dec. 31, 2019. The board has five seats and members, subject to confirmation by the U.S. Senate, serve five-year terms.

On July 31, Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey reserved judgment on Scott's nomination.

"I think that that is the decision of the president and this will be something that the Commerce Committee will weigh in on," Warren told reporters at the time.

"Her nomination will come before the Commerce Committee and we will give her a full and fair hearing, and I think that the president has made a decision, and I think respect has to be given to the president, but we have to go through the process," Markey said at the time.

The NTSB is an independent federal agency "charged by Congress with investigating every civil aviation accident the United States and significant accidents in other modes of transportation - railroad, highway, marine and pipeline," according to its website.

The board on Monday announced plans to launch a "go-team" to Jacksonville, Fla. Tuesday to begin an investigation into the loss of the cargo ship El Faro. The agency said the ship was last heard from on Oct. 1. The Coast Guard announced Monday that the vessel, en route from Jacksonville to Puerto Rico, was "lost in last week's storm." Two graduates of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy were on board.