Today in Medicine: More screen time linked to bad behavior in kids

tv_television_old_box

Topic of Study: Screen time and kids’ behavior
Location of study: U.K.
Study subjects: 11,000 children born between 2000 and 2002
Results: A study published in Archives of Disease in Childhood states that five year-olds who watch TV for more than three hours a day are more likely to engage in negative antisocial behaviors, such as fighting or stealing, by the age of seven. But researchers also found that time spent playing computer or electronic games had no impact on behavior.
Significance: The report stated that the risk of TV’s influence on behavioral development was found to be very small, adding little conclusive evidence to the long waged debate on how screen time affects children’s development.

Topic of Study: Microorganisms and obesity
Location of study: U.S.
Study subjects: 792 people
Results: Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have found that people whose breath had high concentrations of both hydrogen and methane gasses – that is, bad breath — were more likely to be overweight. The cause is an abundance of a microorganism called methanobrevibacter smithii, which helps convert food into energy.
Significance: “Usually, the microorganisms living in the digestive tract benefit us by helping convert food into energy. However, when this particular organism– M. smithii – becomes overabundant, it may alter this balance in a way that causes someone to be more likely to gain weight,” because they hold onto more calories, lead author Dr. Ruchi Mathur says.

Topic of Study: How diet influences disease
Location of study: U.S.
Study subjects: 380,000 people
Results: A 13-year study found that people who made seven lifestyle changes recommended by the American Institute for Cancer Research cut their risk of dying from many diseases – including cancer, circulatory disease and respiratory disease — by 34 percent, compared to those who did not follow the recommendations. The research, published in the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,” found that the greatest ways to reduce the risk of premature death was to avoid being overweight or obese (22 percent lower risk), and eat a plant-based diet (21 percent lower risk).
Significance: Researchers think that this is more evidence that diet and lifestyle greatly affect the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.

Topic of Study: Difficulty getting pregnant linked to neuro problems
Location of study: Denmark
Study subjects: 209 two-year-olds
Results: A study of children born to parents with impaired fertility — that is, those who fail to become pregnant within 12 months of trying — found that neurological development problems in their children were more likely. Most of the children studied were born to parents who become pregnant via fertility treatment. The study, published online in the Fetal & Neonatal Edition of Archives of Disease in Childhood, concluded that longer it took for the women to get pregnant, the more likely her child was to have neurodevelopment problems.
Significance: Ironically, the data shows that efforts to increase fertility may actually be causing more harm than good. Previous studies have found that children conceived via fertility treatment also have a higher risk of premature birth and low birth weight.


News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

Memorial held for Sean Collier, MIT police officer…

More than 1,600 people gathered at MIT on Friday for a memorial service for Sean Collier, the police officer shot to death a year ago in the aftermath of the…

National

Florida man charged with murdering son to play…

A Florida man annoyed that his 16-month-old crying son was preventing him from playing video games suffocated the toddler, police said on Friday.

International

Powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake rattles Mexico

A powerful earthquake struck Mexico Friday, shaking buildings and sending people running into the street, although there were no reports of major damage.

News

OMG! Exercise can make skin (and butt) look…

A moderate exercise regime can turn back time and actually reverse the skin's aging process, according to new research. The study showed that a minimum…

Entertainment

Whoopi Goldberg makes her debut as marijuana columnist

"It helps my head stop hurting, and with glaucoma your eyes ache, and she takes the ache out. It's wonderful," she said.

The Word

Kate Middleton made fun of Prince William's bald…

Kate Middleton and Prince William are in Sydney, Australia, right now, and it sounds like that brash Aussie sense of humor might be rubbing off.

The Word

Is Tom Cruise dating Laura Prepon?

"Mission: Impossible" star Cruise is said to be dating Laura Prepon, star of "Orange is the New Black."

Television

'Scandal' recap: Season 3, Episode 18, 'The Price…

Sally is Jesus, Olivia caused global warming, and Mellie's still drunk. Let's recap the Scandal finale. A church full of Washington insiders is about to…

NHL

NHL video highlights & analysis: Red Wings dump…

NHL video highlights & analysis: Red Wings dump Bruins in Game 1

MLB

MLB video highlights: Orioles top Red Sox, 8-4…

John Lackey roughed up for second straight outing

MLB

MLB video highlights: Red Sox score two in…

Lester shines in Red Sox win over White Sox

Sports

2014 Boston Marathon preview: Elite American, International runners…

2014 Boston Marathon: Elite American, International runners to watch

Tech

VIDEO: 'Vein-scanning' may become the future of paying

Designed to make transactions quicker and easier, the technology works by scanning the unique vein patterns in each person's palm.

Tech

#FollowFriday: 10 of the smartest Twitter accounts

Spending lots of time on Twitter? You might as well learn something. Here are some of the smartest accounts to follow.

Style

Light-up nail art syncs with phone

This Japanese technology syncs light-up nail art with your phone.

Wellbeing

Why is dance cardio taking off in NYC?

Instructors at some of the city's hottest classes explain why.