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MSPCA to build $5 million Cape Cod animal shelter

The MSPCA-Angell in Boston announced plans to build an all-new, state of the art animal care and adoption center in Centerville.

The MSPCA-Angell in Boston on Tuesday announced plans to build an all-new, state of the art animal care and adoption center in Cape Cod.​

The $5 million project will replace Centerville'scurrent, 1960s-era shelter and is expected to be aregional hub for homeless animal adoption as well as a critical community resource for dog training, spay/neuter programs, humane education and many other initiatives.

The MSCPA has raised just over $1.2 million so far, according to a spokesman.

“This is an incredibly exciting time for the animals in our care, as well as our community of donors, staff and volunteers who for the last 45 years have housed and cared for an increasing number of animals in a space that is now completely inadequate for our needs,” said Mary Sarah Fairweather, director of the MSPCA-Cape Cod.

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“Our vision is to create not just a world-class animal care and adoption facility but to grow our base of services we can offer to the community," aid Fairweather.

The design calls for a floor plan of approximately 10,000 square feet - double the size of the current facility -with optimal accommodations for animals and staff, an abundance of natural light and a variety of species-specific, stress-reducing arrangements.

“We’re currently squeezing animals into every available corner, which can be especially stressful for cats and other animals who need a space to call their own,” said Fairweather.

Some of the roughly 600 homeless cats surrendered to the shelter every year are housed in the adjacent house that currently serves as the administrative offices.

The new facility will include separate areas for staff and visitors to engage in adoption counseling and to manage the surrender of animals. There will also be dedicated space for more effective medical and behavioral evaluations, including a modern treatment and sterilization center for shelter animals.

In addition, a large multi-purpose room for training and education programs will be built, which is urgently needed to reduce the homeless pet population on Cape Cod, and it will be an epicenter for innovative, ongoing training programs for owned dogs in the area.

 
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