PHOTOS: Places to visit on Shakespeare’s 450th birthday

Actor Michael Bertenshaw performs in Shakepeare's Henry VIII at the Globe theatre in London July 6, 2010.  Credit: Reuters
Actor Michael Bertenshaw performs in Shakepeare’s Henry VIII at the Globe theatre in London July 6, 2010.
Credit: Reuters

William Shakespeare would celebrate his 450th birthday on Wednesday, and England’s greatest playwright let his imagination roam as widely as his characters.

Here are some of the locales, cited by travel website www.GoEuro.co.uk, associated with Shakespeare and his plays.

Scotland: “Macbeth”

Shakespeare's fictional character Macbeth was the Thane of Cawdor, drawing visitors to the real-life Cawdor Castle in Scotland. Creit: Shemsu.Hor/Flickr
Shakespeare’s fictional character Macbeth was the Thane of Cawdor, drawing visitors to the real-life Cawdor Castle in Scotland.
Creit: Shemsu.Hor/Flickr

“Something wicked this way comes” – the oft-quoted words of the three witches before their second meeting with the brave but ruthless Scottish general, Macbeth. Although there are no sites in Scotland directly connected to the real-life Macbeth – an 11th-century King of Scots – the fictional character’s titles of Thane of Glamis and Thane of Cawdor point to popular attractions Glamis and Cawdor castles. Glamis Castle’s history is as extensive and captivating as its gardens, which are listed in an inventory of Scotland’s grandest gardens. The building is a Grade I listed site, highlighting its historic and cultural significance. Cawdor Castle makes for just as an intriguing a day out, with a number of nature trails in surrounding grounds.

Verona, Italy: “Romeo and Juliet”

"Juliet's Balcony" at the Via Capello in Verona, Italy may have inspired the love scene in Shakepeare's "Romeo and Juliet."  Credit: Wikimedia Commons
“Juliet’s Balcony” at the Via Capello in Verona, Italy may have inspired the love scene in Shakepeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.”
Credit: Wikimedia Commons

“I do remember an apothecary, And hereabouts he dwells” – upon hearing of the death of his beloved Juliet, Romeo seeks out poison so that he may join his lover in death. This poison is sought in the same city in which much of the story is set, Verona in northern Italy, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Although the story of the ill-fated lovers is probably entirely fictitious, visitors can explore the actual previous abodes of the Capulet and Montague families: Via Capello (Juliet’s House), Romeo’s House which is viewable from the outside only, and finally the somber location of Juliet’s tomb, among others. Nobody is sure if Shakespeare ever left Britain, arguing that he may merely have got his descriptions of foreign lands from visitors to London. However, if he traveled anywhere in the world it is arguably Verona that left the most lasting impression, having been the setting for two of his other plays, the “Two Gentlemen of Verona” and “The Taming of the Shrew”.

Athens, Greece: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Athens, Greece is the setting for several Shakespeare plays, most notably "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Athens, Greece is the setting for several Shakespeare plays, most notably “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”
Credit: Wikimedia Commons

“Out of this wood, do not desire to go” – Tatiana’s command to her lover in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is spoken in a wood just outside Athens, the city in which much of the story takes place. There is not a great deal in Athens which actually commemorates the Bard or his use of Athens as a setting for his plays, which also includes “Timon of Athens,” but there are plenty of sights in Athens that evoke the Greek gods who figure in Shakespeare’s comedy.

London, England: Shakespeare’s Globe

The Globe Theatre in London is a recreation of the original playhouse where Shakespeare's works were performed during his lifetime.  Credit: Wikimedia Commons
The Globe Theatre in London is a recreation of the original playhouse where Shakespeare’s works were performed during his lifetime.
Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Opened in 1997, the structure is an approximation of how the original Globe Theatre – owned by Shakespeare’s theatre company, The Lord Chamberlain’s Men – would have looked in the 17th century. Shakespeare’s Globe lies less than 250 meters (yards) from the site of the original theatre, which was demolished in 1644. Performances of Shakespeare’s works take place daily, and as the theatre receives no government subsidies, it relies heavily on donations and income from ticket sales. Shakespeare’s works on offer now and for the next two months include “Hamlet”, “Much Ado About Nothing”, “Antony & Cleopatra”, “Titus Andronicus”, “All’s Well That Ends Well” and – nearer Shakespeare’s home in Stratford-upon-Avon than its fictional setting – “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”.



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