NYPD to purge stop-and-frisk database of names

cop
The NYPD has agreed to clear names from the stop-and-frisk database. Credit: Metro file photo

The New York City Police Department has agreed to purge a database of names and addresses of people stopped by police under the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk program but later cleared of criminal wrongdoing.

The department will scrub the information as part of a settlement ending a lawsuit filed in 2010 in state court by the New York Civil Liberties Union, which announced the agreement on Wednesday.

The settlement applies to people issued a summons or arrested after a police stop but whose cases were dismissed or ended with a fine for a noncriminal violation.

“Though much still needs to be done, this settlement is an important step towards curbing the impact of abusive stop-and-frisk practices,” said Christopher Dunn, the NYCLU’s associate legal director.

City officials said that a law passed in 2010 prohibiting the NYPD from collecting names for people stopped and then immediately released without a summons or arrest had rendered the database ineffective as an investigative tool.

“Today’s settlement is consistent with the 2010 law that the NYPD has been fully compliant with,” said city lawyer Janice Casey Silverberg. “The law made the need for the database moot.”

Dunn said there have been more than half a million stops that included an arrest or a summons since 2004, when he said the NYPD began retaining people’s names in a database for use in future criminal investigations.

The NYPD’s stop-and-frisk strategy, in which patrolling officers stop, question and sometimes frisk suspicious individuals in high-crime neighborhoods, has drawn scrutiny from civil liberties groups concerned that the policy disproportionately affects minorities.

A federal judge in Manhattan is weighing whether to declare the tactic unconstitutional after a 10-week civil trial, a move that could usher in a Department of Justice monitor for the NYPD.

The lawsuit settled Wednesday was filed on behalf of two men who were separately stopped by police in the Bronx and Brooklyn. The men each received two summonses that were later dismissed, but their personal information remained in the NYPD’s database.

New York state law calls for criminal records to be sealed when a case ends in the defendant’s favor, such as a dismissal or an acquittal. In addition, records for defendants convicted of a noncriminal offense, such as a disorderly conduct violation, are also required to be sealed.

The lawsuit claimed the NYPD’s database violated that law by retaining information about defendants who were never convicted of a crime.

Under the terms of the settlement, the city made no admission that the NYPD had violated the plaintiffs’ rights. The city also paid the NYCLU $10,000 as part of the agreement.

The NYPD will continue to track some non-identifying data, including race, for people who are stopped to allow ongoing monitoring of the stop-and-frisk program.


News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

Memorial held for Sean Collier, MIT police officer…

More than 1,600 people gathered at MIT on Friday for a memorial service for Sean Collier, the police officer shot to death a year ago in the aftermath of the…

National

Florida man charged with murdering son to play…

A Florida man annoyed that his 16-month-old crying son was preventing him from playing video games suffocated the toddler, police said on Friday.

International

Powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake rattles Mexico

A powerful earthquake struck Mexico Friday, shaking buildings and sending people running into the street, although there were no reports of major damage.

News

OMG! Exercise can make skin (and butt) look…

A moderate exercise regime can turn back time and actually reverse the skin's aging process, according to new research. The study showed that a minimum…

Entertainment

Whoopi Goldberg makes her debut as marijuana columnist

"It helps my head stop hurting, and with glaucoma your eyes ache, and she takes the ache out. It's wonderful," she said.

The Word

Kate Middleton made fun of Prince William's bald…

Kate Middleton and Prince William are in Sydney, Australia, right now, and it sounds like that brash Aussie sense of humor might be rubbing off.

The Word

Is Tom Cruise dating Laura Prepon?

"Mission: Impossible" star Cruise is said to be dating Laura Prepon, star of "Orange is the New Black."

Television

'Scandal' recap: Season 3, Episode 18, 'The Price…

Sally is Jesus, Olivia caused global warming, and Mellie's still drunk. Let's recap the Scandal finale. A church full of Washington insiders is about to…

MLB

MLB video highlights: Red Sox defeat Orioles, 4-2

Brock Holt the difference in the Red Sox' win

NHL

NHL video highlights & analysis: Red Wings dump…

NHL video highlights & analysis: Red Wings dump Bruins in Game 1

MLB

MLB video highlights: Orioles top Red Sox, 8-4…

John Lackey roughed up for second straight outing

MLB

MLB video highlights: Red Sox score two in…

Lester shines in Red Sox win over White Sox

Parenting

How to parent without gender stereotypes in a…

Christia Spears Brown, Phd. author of "Parenting beyond Pink & Blue" gives advice on raising kids free of gender stereotypes.

Tech

VIDEO: 'Vein-scanning' may become the future of paying

Designed to make transactions quicker and easier, the technology works by scanning the unique vein patterns in each person's palm.

Tech

#FollowFriday: 10 of the smartest Twitter accounts

Spending lots of time on Twitter? You might as well learn something. Here are some of the smartest accounts to follow.

Style

Light-up nail art syncs with phone

This Japanese technology syncs light-up nail art with your phone.