U.S. immigration bill ‘in doubt’ this year, Republican Ryan says

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) departs after a news conference by U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) and other Republican House members in Washington on Oct. 10, 2013. Credit: Reuters
Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) departs after a news conference by U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) and other Republican House members in Washington on Oct. 10, 2013. Credit: Reuters

Republicans will be unlikely to compromise on immigration reform unless U.S. borders are first secured, and the possibility of a broad immigration bill reaching President Barack Obama’s desk this year is “clearly in doubt,” Representative Paul Ryan said on Sunday.

“Security first, no amnesty, then we might be able to get somewhere,” Ryan said on ABC’s “This Week.”

Immigration reform legislation, which the Senate has already passed, has stalled in the Republican-controlled House. Ryan’s comments follow a House document released last week that presents a path toward legal status for 11 million undocumented workers now in the United States.

The plan, rolled out by House Republican leaders, outlines “principles” for immigration reform and embraces an agenda that gives their candidates a campaign message that goes beyond political attacks on Obama.

Asked if Obama would get a bill to sign this year, Ryan replied: “I really don’t know the answer to that question. That’s clearly in doubt.”

It remains unclear if the House principles will advance any further amid deep Republican divisions. The principles are seen as gauging the party’s willingness to tackle such a controversial issue during an election year, when all 435 House seats are at stake.

Last June, the Senate passed a comprehensive bill that would provide a path to citizenship for the approximately 11 million immigrants living in the United States illegally and tighten border security.

The bill stalled in the House, and some conservative Republicans in both chambers remain staunchly opposed to offering legal status for millions of adults who live in the United States unlawfully.

Obama last week hinted in an interview that he might be open to a plan that would first give undocumented workers legal status, as long as they were not permanently barred from becoming citizens.

On NBC’s “Meet the Press,” White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough said the principles offered by the House Republican leadership appeared to represent “pretty good progress.” He added: “We feel pretty good that we will get a bill this year.”

PATH TO CITIZENSHIP?

Obama and his supporters may soon face a hard decision over whether to shelve the creation of a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants and instead embrace border enforcement efforts that they have previously criticized.

“The bottom line here is that he (Obama) doesn’t want to see an America where we have two permanent classes – citizens and non-citizens,” McDonough said.

Ryan said Republicans have made it clear that they will not be forced to compromise with the Senate on a deal and refuse to go to conference committee with the Senate immigration reform bill.

“This is not one of those issues that has a deadline,” he said in the ABC interview. Ryan emphasized that securing the U.S.-Mexico border was a crucial first step before changing rules around legal residency.

“We don’t know who’s coming and going in this country. We don’t have control of our borders,” he said. “Doing nothing on the security side of this isn’t the responsible thing to do.”

House leaders must contend with several conservatives who are suspicious of Obama’s agenda and are reluctant to give the president a long-sought legislative victory.

“We are still having a debate in our caucus,” Ryan said.

House Republican Leader Eric Cantor, appearing on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” said his party wants to make progress on immigration, “step by step.”

“We want to help the situation,” Cantor said.

Incumbents facing a primary challenge or a close general election in this year’s campaign season may have an incentive to oppose the plan’s path to citizenship.

Still, many lawmakers agreed to revamp U.S. policy on immigration after exit polling showed Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney won just 27 percent of the Hispanic vote in 2012. The Republican National Committee made it a priority to reach out to minority voters after the election.

Louisiana Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union” that Republicans should go ahead with immigration reform since it remains the right thing to do and not “because of what some pollster tells us.”

 



News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

Brooklyn man charged in roommate's stabbing death

A Brooklyn man accused of violently stabbing his roommate to death on Monday is in police custody and faces murder charges.

International

Dinosaurs could have survived asteroid strike

It turns out there is a good and a bad time for the planet to be hit by a meteor, and dinosaurs were just unlucky.…

National

OkCupid admits to Facebook-style experimenting on customers

By Sarah McBrideSAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - OkCupid, a top U.S. matchmaking website, intentionally mismatched users to test its technology, the IAC/InterActive Corp service said on…

Local

MTA fares still increasing 4 percent in newly…

The agency said the 4 percent increases, previously announced in December, will remain steady even as the MTA deals with increasing labor costs.

Movies

Interview: Brendan Gleeson on the way 'Calvary' depicts…

Brendan Gleeson talks about how his new film "Calvary" began over drinks and how his character here is the opposite of the lead in "The Guard."

Movies

'Get on Up' producer Mick Jagger on the…

Mick Jagger, a producer on the James Brown biopic "Get on Up," talks about the time had to tell the singer some bad news and his favorite JB record.

Television

'Glee' star Lea Michele to appear on 'Sons…

"Glee" star Lea Michele has been confirmed as a guest star in the final season of "Sons of Anarchy."

Television

TV watch list, Monday, July 28: 'The Bachelorette'…

See Andi Dorfman make her big choice on tonight's 'Bachelorette' finale.

MLB

Angelo Cataldi: Ryan Howard deserves better from Phillies

Just last week, Ryan Howard endured the embarrassment of a benching that was inevitable, and yet still shocking.

NFL

Larry Donnell has inside track in Giants tight…

Little-known Larry Donnell of Grambling State currently has the inside track, as the second-year player has received the bulk of the first-team reps.

NFL

Computer to Jets: Start Michael Vick over Geno…

Jets general manager John Idzik says the choice of who starts between second-year quarterback Geno Smith and veteran Michael Vick will be a “Jets decision.”

MLB

Yankees looking to trade for Josh Willingham: Report

CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Sunday the Yankees are interested in Twins outfielder Josh Willingham.

Travel

Glasgow: Hey, hey, the gangs aren't here

This European city has done a good job getting rid of its more violent residents and revitalizing with artists.

Education

Babson College tops list of best colleges for…

Money magazine has just released its inaugural list of "The Best Colleges for Your Money" -- and the answers have surprised many. Babson College, which…

Education

NYC teens learn how to develop apps during…

Through a program sponsored by CampInteractive, the high schoolers designed their own community-focused apps.

Tech

The Ministry of Silly Walks app is both…

Monty Python have dug into their back catalogue for cash-ins once more, but with the Ministry of Silly Walks app, they've made something that's fun too.