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'Subway therapy' aims to uplift residents with positive notes in Park Street Station

Inspired by a movement that took over New York this week, a Cambridge resident wants to spread positivity with sticky notes in MBTA stations.
People write their messages on self-stick paper as a part of a public art project namGetty Images / Anadolu Agency

If you're traveling through the Park Street T stop Friday night, you'll probably see some notes stuck to the walls with uplifting messages.

They'll be there thanks to Venita Subramanian, a 29-year-old Cambridge resident. For theevent, which she's dubbed "Subway Therapy Boston," Subramanian hopes to reach people who have been a bit depressed since the election results.

"The goal for the project is to just uplift people and make them believe it's not so bad," she said. "Regardless of what you believe politically, we can all come together as one and just share positive messages."

Subramanian said that she was inspired by the New York subway therapy movement, in which a street artist set up a table at a Manhattan subway station and asked passers-by to write something on a sticky note and put it up on the wall, according to the New York Times.

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Subramanian is prepping by making a list of statements she can scrawl on the notes, like "spread the love," she said, but she's also leaving a lot of it up to the people who pass by.

"It's about people expressing themselves, whatever they want to write," she said.

Some people who have seen her Facebook event have already reached out to Subramanian, she said. They've told her that they "need this" and are looking forward to it.

Subramanian will get started tonight at 9 p.m. in Park Street Station. She reached out to the MBTA to let them know about her plan after it started getting some attention and said she got their blessing to go ahead.

Originally from the United Arab Emirates, Subramanian said that she's already heard from friends back home wondering if she should leave the United States, but she doesn't want to leave.

"I know there are issues and people believe in different things, but generally, where I live in Cambridge, everybody is so open minded," she said."I want it to stay that way, so whatever little thing we can do as individuals, [let's] just reinforce that and remind people that this is what Boston is about."

 
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