If you can't make the Women's March on Washington, but still want to protest the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump, don't worry: There's a Boston march, and you'll see some familiar faces there. 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey and Boston Mayor Marty Walsh have officially joined the roster of speakers who will kick off the Jan. 21 event, organizers announced. 

“I stand shoulder-to-shoulder with women and people of all backgrounds from across Massachusetts at the Boston Women’s March for America,” Warren said in a statement. “This gathering is a chance for us to come together to make clear that we believe in basic dignity, respect and equal rights for every person in this country, and that we are committed to fighting back against bigotry in all its forms.”

The Boston Women's March for America is just one sister march across the country in conjunction with the March on Washington. Event organizers say that more than 25,000 people are expected to gather at the Boston Common around 11 a.m. that Saturday.

In Washington, more than 180,000 people said that they would attend the march on Facebook — in order to get the most accurate count, organizers are asking for attendees to register ahead of time online.

Marches are also planned in Philadelphia, New York, San Francisco and other cities. 

Boston's march will start with a speaking portion at the corner of Beacon and Charles streets. Along with Warren, Healey and Walsh, other local advocates will speak at the event.

“I am proud to join people in Boston and across the country as we stand up and march for our values, liberties and freedoms from discrimination," Walsh said in a statement. "Boston has been and will continue to be a city that is open and inclusive to all, it is part of who we are and what we stand for." 

The march is meant to send a message, organizers say, that the United States will continue to uphold human decency, equal rights and ensure freedom from discrimination.

"The Boston Women's March for America embodies our fundamental belief of freedom and equality for all, and it puts a stake in the ground saying that we will not compromise our values," Walsh said. "Together we will defend our friends, neighbors and family members from any and all efforts to exclude them, harm them or strip them of their rights.” 

After Trump's Nov. 8 win, Healey took multiple steps to ensure the safety of Massachusetts residents from that kind of harm and hate. She launched a hotline for residents to report instances of hate, she vowed to take Trump to court if he enacted unconstitutional campaign promises, and she spoke at a Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Coalition event. 

“We need to act to build on and protect the progress we’ve made in our communities, throughout Massachusetts and across the nation,” Healey said in a statement. “I’m thrilled to stand with the people in this historic march for our shared values and priorities.”