As Chelsea Clinton, now 36, gets ready to take the DNC stage Thursday night, it’s as much her biggest moment as it is her mother’s.

Chelsea, the only child of former President Bill Clinton and the first female nominee for president Hillary Clinton, could be one of the only kids in history to have both her parents run a country.

Thursday may be the biggest speech of Chelsea’s life, but the political spotlight is nothing new to this first daughter who was 12 when her father was elected president of the United States.

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Though her parents wanted her to have as normal an existence as a girl going through their awkward years of growing up in the White House could, Chelsea couldn’t avoid what Bill Clinton called “insensitive” attacks from the press.

Chelsea survived the press and her teens — heading to Stanford for college and weathering the Monica Lewinsky scandal. She later went on to study international relations at Oxford University. Clinton then joined the consulting firm McKinsey & Company in New York City, and after three years moved on to the hedge fund Avenue Capital Group. Clinton returned to school in late 2009 to study health policy and management at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

During that time she also announced her engagement to banker Marc Mezvinsky. The two now have a daughter Charlotte Clinton Mezvinsky, born in September 2014, and a son Aidan Clinton Mezvinsky, born in June 2016.

From 2011 to 2014, Clinton was a special correspondent for NBC. She is currently serving as as vice chairperson for her father's Clinton Foundation, and is on the board of the School of American Ballet.

Chelsea has also been hard at work hitting the campaign trail for her mother.

It’s easy to compare Chelsea with another daughter this election season - Ivanka Trump. The two actually struck up a friendship long before the political rivalry between their parents. But at an event Tuesday, when asked about Ivanka’s speech at the GOP convention last week, in which she "talked about how [her father] would fight for equal pay for equal work and would focus on making quality child care accessible for all," according to CBS News, Clinton had this question for her friend: “How would your father do that?”

"Given it's not something that he has spoken about, there are no policies on any of those fronts that you just mentioned on his website — not last week, not this week," she added. "So I think the 'how' question is super important. In politics as it is in life."