Hillary Clinton celebrated the conclusion of the DNC in Philadelphia this week with a victory rally before a packed arena audience.

Clinton opened her talk by praising the DNC's host city Philadelphia, calling it a "beautiful city" for hosting the convention.

"This has been such an invigorating and exciting week," Clinton said to loud applause.

But the presidential candidate, who is preparing to embark on a post-DNC jobs tour through Pennsylvania and Ohio, soon shifted to taking jabs at opponent Donald Trump.

"Donald Trump painted a picture, a negative, dark, divisive picture of a country in decline," Clinton told the packed auditorium at Temple University. "He insisted that America is weak, and he told us all, after laying out this very dark picture, that 'I alone can fix it.'"

Clinton compared Trump to the monarchs whom the nation's founders were fighting against when they penned the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia 240 years ago.

"At the Republican National Convention, Donald Trump talked for 75 minutes and did not offer one single solution. His entire speech seemed more about insulting me than helping the American people."

In her first 100 days, Clinton pledged to "break through the gridlock and make the biggest investment in new good-paying jobs since World War II," specifically jobs in infrastructure, clean energy and advanced manufacturing.

President Obama proposed a $447 billion bill in 2011 to invest in jobs, which has languished in the federal legislature.

Vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine contrasted Clinton with Trump in his remarks, repeating that he had a "negative vision" and calling Clinton a "you're-hired president" versus Trump as a "you're-fired president." 

Clinton also repeated a line from her DNC speech that seems sure to become a slogan of her campaign: "There is nothing wrong with America that can't be cured by what's right with America."

The victory rally featured speeches from Philadelphia and state political figures who gave their support to Clinton, including Mayor Jim Kenney, candidate for attorney general Josh Shapiro, candidate for U.S. Senate Katie McGinty, U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, and U.S. Sen. Bob Casey Jr. 

Clinton clinched the historic nomination for president at the Democratic National Convention this week, even as delegates and activists still fighting in support of her primary race opponent Bernie Sanders protested Clinton's nomination inside and outside the convention hall.