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Anyone for Tennis?

With so many artists competing for recognition in the cutthroat, blog-centric indie music machine these days, how can anyone stand out? One method: have an unusual story.

With so many artists competing for recognition in the cutthroat, blog-centric indie music machine these days, how can anyone stand out? One method: have an unusual story. It worked for Girls, whose frontman escaped from a cult, and now we have Denver’s Tennis, a husband-and-wife duo whose songs document their post-college sailing trip up and down the Eastern Seaboard.

But Tennis’ sailing trip is far more than a mere press kit factoid, according to lead singer and keyboardist Alaina Moore.

“It’s what motivated us to start making music in the first place,” she says.

The breezy, reverb-laden surf-pop of their debut album, “Cape Dory,” extols, like a travel brochure, the joys of what Moore describes as a “firsthand experience of our environment, genuine exploration and adventure … a simple, intentional life free of mediation.”

Few are fortunate enough to be able to live such a life, of course, and some critics, unmoved by what they see as the band’s preciousness, have made Tennis an example of over-privileged bourgeois frivolity.

“It’s just because they’re cynical,” Moore says. “We were like, genuinely that happy, in an unaffected, good place. People who live on sailboats, for the most part, are like that. It’s like this best-kept secret to a happy life.”

Cover story

What inspired that ridiculous album cover for “Cape Dory”?

“We didn’t have any press photos with our faces, so we thought it would be funny to just surprise people and do this really campy, silly, old-school photo of just me,” Moore explains. “Then it got leaked to the Internet and it was ‘formally’ announced as being our album cover, and every media source had it publicized within a couple of days. And by the time we found out it was kind of too late [to change


 
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