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Watching the Wax Museum come to life

David Wax Museum are in that beautifully hectic state of incline wherethey say yes to almost everything  that comes their way, and it seemsthey’re fulfilling the title of their most recent album, “Everything IsSaved.”

David Wax Museum are in that beautifully hectic state of incline where they say yes to almost everything that comes their way, and it seems they’re fulfilling the title of their most recent album, “Everything Is Saved.”

“For many years we were booking all the shows ourselves,” says frontman David Wax. “I think that now opportunities are coming knocking and it’s just too hard to turn them down.”

His partner in song, Suz Slezak, says it’s been refreshing to transition from being an opening band that people happen to catch to a band that audiences get there on time to see.

“It’s really a new realm to be able to go to a brand new city and have people singing along to our songs,” she says. “That did not used to happen. So that’s an exciting turning point.”

The band began in Boston in 2007, shortly after Wax returned from the Mexican countryside, where he had begun a yearlong musical fellowship. What he brought back with him were deeper understandings of and a love for the rhythms and instruments of that area. His enthusiasm was so contagious that when he recruited Sle-zak, who primarily played fiddle, he convinced her to invest in an instrument called a quijada, which is an actual donkey jawbone.

 
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