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Did H&M just find the new 'It' designer?

At the 2016 H&M Design Award, the Swedish retailer, alongside an A-list jury, looks for the future of fashion.

Fashion lovers, remember this name: Hannah Jinkins.

The 24- year-old designer, hailing from London, just beat out 400 other design student’s from around the world to grab the top prize at H&M’s Design Award 2016.

To win the coveted prize — which includes $54,000, a fall 2016 collaboration with H&M and a year-long mentorship with the brand — Jinkins had to wow a jury of style arbiters which included Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing (the brand’s current collaborator), actress Kate Bosworth, H&M creative advisor Ann-Sofie Johansson and the blogging world’s biggest fashion star, Chiara Ferragni (The Blonde Salad).

RELATED:Olivier Rousteing on Kendall Jenner dancing in the Balmain x H&M campaign video

The panel, who had already whittled down the competitors from 24 to eight semifinalist for a runway showdown at Kensington Palace in London, described the Royal College of Art student’s workwear-inspired collection as “raw and refined."

Jinkins showed utilitarian looks, including oversized jumpsuits, selvedge denim and fishermen-esque smocks, some topped off with oversized brass staples.


“We’re not looking for something commercial at this point,” said H&M creative advisor, Margareta van den Bosch, of Jinkins’ aesthetic. “If you have ideas, you can always make something out of it.”

The overwhelmed winner said she’s excited to see “how things can be commercialized. It’ll be nice to see how people can wear [the collection] on an everyday basis." As for the cash prize? The British designer intends to "invest it in her own brand, and maybe buy a puppy."

Expert advice

Ferragni, who has over five million Instagram followers, had some advice for Jinkins. “She needs to create her social media vision,” said the blogger. “You have to think about how you want to portray yourself. If her clothing is worn by the right people — the cool people — it can be a powerful thing and send a product viral.”
“It’s a matter of being really close to your target group,” added Johansson of the social media phenomenon. “We look to pop culture which is picked up on the street, goes via the runway and back to the street.”
— Richard Peckett

 

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