The world’s monuments are all dried up in a new series of images by an American graphic designer.

Joel Krebs, whose work is called “Iconic landmarks after drought,” edits the surroundings of wonders, such as the Eiffel Tower, the Taj Mahal and Macchu Picchu. 

What message do you want to spread with this series?
- Our ever-changing climate can have a serious impact on some of the most well-known places on Earth. A severe drought can change your entire perspective on something so familiar. Is global warming a great concern for you? Personally, I am not concerned. I believe the weather pattern is in a constant state of change. I think it’s very difficult to track weather patterns that go back thousands of years. Ultimately, I know God is in control.

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What inspired you to create this series?
- I entered a contest that called for designers to remove famous landmarks from their surroundings, as if they suddenly vanished. I took Niagara Falls and essentially removed the water. After completing my entry, I noticed that the image could be the result of a future climate shift where severe drought completely takes over. I thought about other landmarks and what they may look like with the same approach. Showing the before and after creates a contrast and gives a unique perspective on some of the most famous locations on the planet.

How did you go about creating these images?

- Everything I create is done through Adobe Photoshop. I duplicate the image and work side by side to create the drought-like effects.

How do you choose the location for your creations?

- Google Images. I searched for the most famous landmarks and choose the images that look the greenest to create the greatest contrast.

- By Daniel Casillas