Upon first seeing images of the black bun Whopper from Burger King my first thought was, "Who would eat this?"
 
My second immediate thought was, "Me."
 
Around 9:30 on Monday morning I marched over to the Burger King across the street from Metro's office expecting a blizzard of eager burger fan boys waiting to snatch up the black bun burger. There were instead about three people total, one of whom might have been homeless.
 
 
"I'd like one black bun burger please," I asked the cashier. 
 
She looked at me with eyes that said "It's breakfast time, you fool!"
 
I ordered a meal with fries and a drink because what am I? An animal?
 
Back at the office I unwrapped the black bun Whopper, spread out the fries, stabbed my soda with a straw and let my eyes feast on the oddity that sat before me.
 
 
Burger King states that the Whopper's bun is black because A.1. steak sauce, which I have never consumed in all my 25 years, is baked ino the bun.
 
Speaking of the bun, it is unsurpsisingly, rather odd looking and feeling. Small slivers of its skin were flaking off like a croissant, in the way a very old soccer ball slowly starts peeling. In addition, while normal buns seem to feel fluffy and welcoming, like a nice mattress for your piece of grilled cow flesh, this felt a bit dense, heavy and not comfortable for my patty.
 
As far as taste?

Well it tasted like a burger with a little bit of BBQ sauce on it.
 
There's nothing "black" in its flavor (not that Burger King claims this, or anything). The most noticeable quality of the burger was, yet again, how dense the bun felt. 
 
What would have impressed me a bit more is if Burger King had repeated the stunt they pulled in Japan: Using not only black buns but "black cheese, black ketchup, all made from squid ink and bamboo charcoal," according to TIME. 
 
Would I eat it again? No. 
 
Why did I eat it to begin with?

Well, as Bridget Jones says to Daniel Cleaver in Bridge Jones' Diary: "I'm a serious journalist." 

Now, let me finish burying my shame in this Whopper. 

Matt Lee is a Web producer for Metro New York. He writes about almost everything and anything. Talk to him (or yell at him) on Twitter so he doesn’t feel lonely @mattlee2669.