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Alligators, pythons and a tarantula removed from Brooklyn public housing apartment

Animal Care & Control was called in to remove one boa constrictor, five pythons, two bearded dragons, two alligators, a gecko, a scorpion and a tarantula.

Police on Friday confiscated alligators, snakes and other exotic pets illegally being held at a public housing unit in Crown Heights, Brooklyn.



The NYPD said it came across the animals at the Weeksville Houses on Dean Street while executing an unrelated search warrant.



Animal Care & Control was then called in to remove one boa constrictor, five pythons, two bearded dragons, two alligators, a gecko, a scorpion and a tarantula.



It is against New York City Housing Authority rules to have these pets, but no arrests were made, according to police.



"Most of the animals removed were illegal," said Richard Gentles, a spokesman with Animal Care & Control. "They have since been placed with an [organization] that specializes in their care."



The ASPCA says that keeping exotic pets is "bad for the animals, bad for us and bad for the environment."

Whoa, hello there!




This is certainly not the first time that potentially dangerous exotic animals have turned up in the city. Here are some of the more notable ones to get press attention:

1. August 2011: A 10-foot python was found coiled up in the bathroom sink of a Brownsville, Brooklyn, apartment.

2. October 2007: A 7-foot python made its way up some piping and into the toilet of a fourth-floor walkup in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn.

3. October 2003: Police rappelled down a 19-story public housing building in Harlem in order to tranquilize a 425-pound tiger. A large caiman was also found in that unit.

 
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