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Playoff pucks mean big bucks for Boston business

The big Bruins win Saturday did a lot to fuel the city's hockey fever, but whether our sports teams win or lose, playoff games of any kind mean big bucks for Boston.

Boston Bruins fans from all over are flocking to Boston with their wallets in hand to enjoy the Stanley Cup Playoffs. The Pro Shop at the TD Garden was full of B's fans picking up hot merchandise. PHOTO BY NICOLAUS CZARNECKI/METRO       Boston Bruins fans from all over are flocking to Boston with their wallets in hand to enjoy the Stanley Cup Playoffs. The Pro Shop at the TD Garden was full of B's fans picking up hot merchandise. PHOTO BY NICOLAUS CZARNECKI/METRO

The big Bruins win Saturday did a lot to fuel the city's hockey fever, but whether our sports teams win or lose, playoff games of any kind mean big bucks for Boston.

“Major post-season sports events such as the Stanley Cup finals are great for boosting both the city’s competitive spirit as well as our economy," said Charles Rudnick,
vice president of communications for the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce.

He estimates that the city rakes in roughly $5 million per Bruins playoff game, not counting ticket sales, with wealth trickling across the board. Hotels, transportation, restaurants, retailers, and of course, bars, all get a taste of the financial feast.

"It's spending that gets spread out over a number of businesses. It really is good news for our economy," said Pat Moscaritello, president and CEO of the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau. "We're very passionate about our sports teams, but we tend to only think of it as a big business for the players, owners and agents, but it's also big business for the city's visitor economy."

According to Moscaritello, about 30 percent of the 17,500 TD Garden spectators come from outside the Boston area.

The playoffs are especially good news for local businesses that took a hit during the Bruins lockout. A regular season Bruins game brings in about $1 million, and with 34 games cancelled, businesses missed out on a ton of cash.

"Here we are into the middle of June and we’re still playing hockey. This is not something that you'd normally see, and that's good. When businesses are building their budgets for the year, they usually don't factor in revenue from NHL games this late in the season," Moscaritello said. "The Stanley Cup trophy is silver, but for our visitor economy, just to be in the finals is gold."

Follow Morgan Rousseau on Twitter: @MetroMorgan
Follow Metro Boston on Twitter: @MetroBOS

 
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