Home
 
Choose Your City
Change City

City leaders hit streets to remind residents about paid sick leave law

Lawmakers and volunteers across the five boroughs spent most of Wednesday reminding New Yorkers about the new paid sick law, which Mayor Bill de Blasio signed three months into his term. Credit: NYC Mayor's Office/Twitter Lawmakers and volunteers across the five boroughs spent most of Wednesday reminding New Yorkers about the new paid sick law, which Mayor Bill de Blasio signed three months into his term.
Credit: NYC Mayor's Office/Twitter

Starting July 30, New Yorkers can use accrued paid sick days provided by the previously controversial law swept into place by the de Blasio administration earlier this year.

Lawmakers and volunteers across the five boroughs spent most of Wednesday reminding New Yorkers about the law, which Mayor Bill de Blasio signed three months into his term.

RelatedArticles

De Blasio himself donned a yellow T-shirt emblazoned with the hashtag "#paidsickleave" as he and Department of Consumer Affairs Commissioner Julie Menin — whose agency will administer the law — passed out fliers during the morning commute at the Atlantic Avenue subway station.

"We don’t want to have a situation where people have to choose between their health and the ability to put food on the table for their families," de Blasio said to volunteers. "We want a little more decency in our society, where people can have both."

Various City Council members, most of whom passed the bill in March, similarly visited local subway stops to pass out pamphlets.

Any New Yorker not eligible for paid sick leave through who works more than 80 hours at a business with five or more employees a year can earn one hour of paid sick time for every 30 hours worked.

That means one can earn up to 40 hours of sick time every year to care for themselves or a family member.

Businesses with fewer than five employees are required to allow unpaid sick leave.

The original law passed last year despite a veto from former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, but was seen by many advocates — including then Public Advocate and mayoral candidate de Blasio — as a weaker compromise between the City Council and business community concerned about its economic impact.

Follow Chester Jesus Soria on Twitter@chestersoria

 
Consider AlsoFurther Articles