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Club owner: Police report full of ‘lies’

The owner of a private nightclub that was shut down by Boston Police on New Year’s Eve doesn’t want his club to have the same reputation as the officer who closed it.

The owner of a private nightclub that was shut down by Boston Police on New Year’s Eve doesn’t want his club to have the same reputation as the officer who closed it.

Darrin Morda, owner of Rise on Stuart Street, said he was “appalled and shocked” by what he said were “lies” that were posted online Sunday as part of an incident report.

“The whole thing is just ridiculous,” Morda said.

Police alleged that the bar was guilty of various safety violations — including having 800 people in the club, which has an authorized capacity of 292.

The officer named in the report, Sgt. Detective Daniel Keeley, is known for his aggressive approach and earned the nickname “Mr. Homicide” for his ability to garner a murder conviction. However, his methods have been criticized in recent years.

Police originally charged the club owners with failure to comply with the conditions of their fire permit.

Steve MacDonald, a Boston Fire Department spokesman, said yesterday the club would not be cited and a review of the permits showed the club was up to date.

Police said they stand by the report and will work with their licensing unit to determine how to proceed.

Is officer ‘tainted goods’?

A 2005 profile by Boston magazine called Sgt. Detective Daniel Keeler “tainted goods.”

That profile also recounted how Keeler admitted to making false statements on a police report and in an affidavit for a Dorchester shooting about seven years ago.

In 1980 he was suspended for four days after he and another off-duty officer harassed women working at a bar, the profile said.

Keeler avoided more trouble in 2006 when video of him allegedly stealing sunglasses from a Newbury Street shop during an investigation was leaked. A clerk magistrate found there was not enough evidence, but he was later suspended for 30 days for using poor judgment during that incident and for lying about talking to a reporter.

 
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