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Philadelphia e-cigarettes smoking ban now in effect

The law banning the use of battery-powered e-cigarette devices went into effect at midnight.

E-cigarette manufacturers have seen a surge in popularity for the battery-powered devices that give users a vapor filled experience with nicotine and other additives, like flavoring. Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images E-cigarette manufacturers have seen a surge in popularity for the battery-powered devices that give users a vapor filled experience with nicotine and other additives, like flavoring. Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Philadelphia is now vapor-free.

The law banning the use of battery-powered e-cigarette devices went into effect at midnight.

The city-wide ban, which mirrors the original smoke-free ban that went into effect in 2007, prohibits “vaping” in workplaces, restaurants and bars as well as outdoor seating areas and patios at these locations, and within 20 feet of commercial building entrances. The law also applies to all other electronic smoking devices, such as vape pens, e-hookahs and e-cigars.

Violators will now be ticketed $250 per breach.

An accompanying bill, which passed simultaneously, prevents the sale of e-cigarette devices to minors. That law went into effect at the time of the bill's signing in April.

In late April, Mayor Michael Nutter signed an executive order which bans smoking in all city parks, which is essentially an extension of the 2007 ban.

And at the end of April the Food and Drug Administration announced it was working on new, stricter regulations of the battery-powered devices that burn a nicotine-based liquid that is vaporized and then inhaled. While electronic cigarettes are not a tobacco-based product, they do contain the stimulant nicotine.

The FDA currently only regulates cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and self-rolled tobacco products.

Follow Tommy Rowan on Twitter:@tommyrowan

 

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