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Supshot lets smartphone users cash in on mobile photos

Hurricane Sandy and the Boston Marathon bombings helped inspire a trio of Boston entrepreneurs to launch a mobile app that lets non-professional photographers snap and sell pictures taken with their smartphones.

From left, co-founder Azeem Khan, 25, intern Afshan Nasseri, 16, co-founder Logan Spence, 21, and co-founder Neal Gardner, 24, of  Supshot, which lets smartphone users upload their photos and sell them. PHOTO BY NICOLAUS CZARNECKI/METRO From left, co-founder Azeem Khan, 25, intern Afshan Nasseri, 16, co-founder Logan Spence, 21, and co-founder Neal Gardner, 24, of Supshot, which lets smartphone users upload their photos and sell them.
PHOTO BY NICOLAUS CZARNECKI/METRO

Monumental news events like Hurricane Sandy and the Boston Marathon bombings helped inspire a trio of Boston entrepreneurs to launch a mobile app that lets non-professional photographers snap and sell pictures taken with their smartphones.

Creators of Supshotbelieve that the app, which is available on iPhones, will come in especially handy during breaking news events, as smartphone-armed bystanders will be able to capture the moment and offer it to the public before journalists make it to the scene.

“I honestly think the media will be the biggest customer; bloggers, editorial magazines, travel magazines, newspapers," said Azeem Khan, who launched the app last month along with co-founders Neal Gardner and Logan Spence.

The app utilizes three licensing options: users can either offer their photos free of charge; sell them non-exclusively for $15 a pop; or charge $30 for exclusive rights.

Using hashtags, photos are tagged by the location and time of the photographed event.

There is no limit on how many photos users can upload or purchase. Creators are working to introduce video sharing to the app, but for now, spreading the word is their main priority.

For Gardner, the app offers 1.5 billion smartphones users across the world a chance to monetize their click craft.

"So many people can take a great photo and share it instantly. During the (Boston Marathon) bombing, so many news companies were asking people to use their photos," said Gardner. "Pretty much anyone in the right place at right time can get an amazing picture with their phone, make some money and get it out there."

More information is available at www.supshotapp.com.

Follow Morgan Rousseau on Twitter: @MetroMorgan
Follow Metro Boston on Twitter: @MetroBOS

 
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