This week in NYC, eat yourself silly while learning something about the food community around you, Madonna is back with a new tour, browse the city's largest photo exhibit and more things to do.

San Gennaro Feast
Sept. 10-20
Little Italy, Manhattan
Free

The Feast of Feasts returns to Little Italy for 11 days starting today. Now in its 89th year, the festival is an raucous party with everything from a parade (Saturday, with Grand Marshal Tony Danza) to a cannoli-eating contest. There’s also live entertainment each night on the Festival Stage at Grand and Mott streets.

Brunch Night! with Jamie LeeLo
Sept. 10, 9:30 p.m.
Caroline’s, 1626 Broadway
$20

If you love the barbed social commentary of late-night talk shows, but you’re sick of seeing the same old white men delivering it, check out Brunch Night! Jamie LeeLo uses her stand-up and storytelling skills to add feminine flair to the format. The show returns with special guest Bebe Neuwirth and music by rocker Emily Danger.

Photoville
Sept. 11-20
Brooklyn Bridge Park
Free

Music, war, nature — see it all through the eyes of the people who were there to capture it at this pop-up village set among 65 shipping containers making up the city’s largest photo exhibit. Whether you’re a professional or an enthusiast, prepare to be inspired by, question and debate what we see (and how we see it) at panels, peer reviews, live performances and nighttime programs from photo agencies, and then wind down at the on-site food and beer garden. -Eva Kis

Taste Talks Brooklyn
Sept. 11-13
85 Wythe Ave., Brooklyn
$100-$450

The kiddies went back to regular school, but for the rest of us there’s this three-day food symposium curated by DJ-foodie Questlove. The kickoff alone is a rooftop party with live tunes by the man himself and chef Dominique Ansel living his “time is an ingredient” credo by making desserts on-site. There’s also a massive barbecue; an oyster-and-Champagne party; a Future Food Expo, demons and panels. -Eva Kis

Five Boroughs Music Festival
Sept. 11, 2015-May 7, 2016
Various locations
$25-$95

Get your fix of classic and contemporary chamber music at the ninth annual Five Boroughs Music Festival. As the name implies, the goal is to spread the concerts throughout NYC. Kicking off the season is the American Contemporary Music Ensemble on Sept. 11 at the National Opera Center. Other artists include Pallade Musica, Acronym (with Les Canards Chantants) and The Colonials. Ticket packages are extremely generous: For adults, single concerts are $25 while three are $60 and five are $95.

Vendy Awards
Sept. 12, 12:30-5 p.m.
Governors Island
$100-$145

Lunch decisions are always hard as you stare down the long line of food trucks, but this weekend will be even more difficult as the best of the city’s mobile vendors all gather to compete in the “Oscars of street food.” You picked the nominees, and after tasting across everything in all five categories from over 25 vendors, you’ll pick the winners, too. Plus an open beer and wine bar, and live music. VIP tickets include a whole extra hour to taste, special seating and an open liquor bar. -Eva Kis

The Ensemblist & The Bowery Boys
Sept. 13, 7 and 9 p.m.
54 Below, 254 W. 54th St.
$25-$70, 54below.com

If you’re a fan of the secret history of NYC, you’re probably already aware of The Bowery Boys. This week Tom Meyers and Greg Young join forces with The Ensemblist’s Nikka Graff Lanzarone and Mo Brady for a one-night-only concert for an in-depth look at the St. James Theater from its opening to the present day. The Bowery Boys handle the “where” and “when,” while the theater podcasters interview Broadway talent and perform numbers from various productions on the storied stage.

PJ Rasmussen and the Boardwalk Jazz Band
Sept. 13, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
City Winery, 155 Varick St.
$10

Labor Day has come and gone, but it’s still 90 degrees outside. Cling to the feeling of strolling along a breezy beach boardwalk with PJ Rasmussen and the Boardwalk Jazz Band at City Winery on Sept. 13. The group gained popularity on the Asbury Park Boardwalk this summer, with jazz for a younger audience, so check them out if you think there’s nothing between Big Band and improv in the genre.

Madonna
Sept. 16-17, 8 p.m.
Madison Square Garden
Sept. 19, 8 p.m.
Barclays Center
$55-$360

This is still Madonna’s world. Her latest album, “Rebel Heart,” shows she’s been listening to the way trends are moving, and even though she’s not setting them anymore, she can still offer an original spin. Plus, you won’t find a more committed performer — costume changes aren’t so impressive once you’ve seen a Madonna show, where entire sets are brought in for a single song. The excess of ’90s concerts was glorious, and we’re glad she’s still rocking it. -Eva Kis

Ana Popovic
Sept. 16, 8 p.m.
Highline Ballroom, 431 W. 16 th St.
$20-$40

Straight out of Memphis – by way of Serbia – Ana Popovic is one of the hottest and most unexpected blues guitarists performing today. This week, she stops in at the Highline Ballroom to promote her latest album. Mixing in Serbian influences from her childhood, and recorded with her father, Milton Popovic, “Blue Room” offers a more personal take on her usual gutsy, all-American sound. Tickets are $20-$40, but there’s also a $10 minimum per person. Seating is first-come, first-served.

Intelligence Squared U.S.
Sept. 16, 6:45-8:30 p.m.
Kaufman Center, 129 W. 67 th St.
$40

When sexual assault takes place on campus, should a court or the campus have jurisdiction? IQ2US is a nonprofit organization that hosts debates from some of the world’s top analytical minds to delve into hot topics that are hard to reconcile – like the issue of how to handle college sex crimes, a theme that will be tackled on Sept. 16 by four professors from the law schools of NYU, CUNY, Yale and Harvard. There’s also a reception prior to the debate at 5:45 p.m.

David Starkey at Brooklyn Public Library
Sept. 17, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn Public Library, 10 Grand Army Plaza
Free

There’s a lot that the Colonies didn’t see eye-to-eye on even after the Revolutionary War, and David Starkey’s new book is all about a topic that still inspires tension today. “The Magna Carta: The Medieval Roots of Modern Politics” seeks to dispel common myths about the Constitution’s origins and how it still affects modern politics, followed by a book signing. With the 2016 presidential election just around the corner, it’s a great time to get our facts straight.