Ahead of the Women’s March, poster-making events were held across New York City for marchers to visually prepare for the event in Washington.

Hazel Morley, 30, hosted a small gathering at her Ridgewood, Queens apartment last Sunday. With the scent of magic marker and Aperol Spritzes in the air, Morley, who works as a men’s clothing designer, said making her grievances heard through art was a natural impulse.

“Being a designer, you ask yourself how you can get involved and how you can make change,” Morley said. “So I figured why not put my skills to use.”

Posters created over the afternoon included slogans that read “Grab This Pussy” — accompanied by an image of glittery female anatomy — and “My Body My Rights.”

Morley said she is planning to drive to D.C. early Saturday morning with seven friends in a rented van so that she can personally advocate for a woman’s right to choose and for paid family leave.

“It seems like that should be a bipartisan support area.” She said. “I think it’s really important for us to be marching on the doorstep of the White House to show that we’re here and we're 51 percent of population. Now that the election is over, I think it’s more about sending the message on what policies you want supported.

“It’s more productive. And I think almost, deep down, because Trump is from New York, that he’s more progressive than a typical Republican.”