An audit released Sunday by City Comptroller Scott Stringer found animals at overcrowded Animal Care & Control shelters were being given expired medications and subject to poor living conditions.

AC&C has a five-year, $51.9 million contract with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to shelter and care for animals in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Staten Island, and run drop-off centers in Queens and the Bronx.

The four-month audit between December 2013 and March 2014 found animals were given expired controlled substances. Shelters did not keep accurate records of controlled substances, according to the audit, and drugs as old as 13 years were found in the facilities. 

Auditors also found vaccinations were stored alongside employee lunches, and animal remains, though vaccines are supposed to be stored separately from food. 

More than $12,000 in undocumented credit card expenses were found, as well as $18,000 in late payments, were found.

“Animal Care & Control is running an operation that could make your stomach turn,” Stringer said in a prepared statement. “How we treat our most vulnerable creatures is a reflection of our decency as a society, and AC&C is failing in that important responsibility.”

Stringer’s office said AC&C and the health department agreed with the majority of the 18 recommendations made by his office.