By now, we've all heard and felt the heatwave that hit NYC. Mayor de Blasio made an announcement, cooling centers opened and everyone is sweating 10 times as much as they typically do (disclaimer: this is not exact math).

But for some New Yorkers the heat is particularly troublesome due to their workplace and for others work serves as an escape. Check out some of the best and worst jobs to have in the sweltering heat. 


  1. Swim Teacher/Coach

    You get to spend a scorching hot day in a nice cool pool, what more could you ask for? Sure, you may come home a little pruny but better to be pruny and cool than clammy and hot -- that’s what they say (no one says this).
  1. Ben and Jerry’s Flavor Guru -- this is a real thing and my personal dream (sorry, Metro).

    Isn’t this EVERYONE’S dream? To be the person that tastes a bunch of different food and ice cream all day and night until you come up with the perfect concoction? The answer is yes, and if your answer is no, then you need to rethink your life and your priorities.
  1. Doing basically anything in an air-conditioned cubicle

    Working in a cubicle may not be your dream gig, but on a sweltering summer’s day that air-conditioned square will seem like a dream come true -- especially after your walk from the sweltering subway stop (See number 2 on worst jobs).
  1. Dolphin trainer

    This is a cool job on any day really, but is particularly great on a hot day. You’re rocking a wet suit and are in and out of the water allowing you to cool off and avoid the pruning issue that comes with being a swim instructor. On top of that, you’re training dolphins.
  1. A stay-at-home parent in a home with air conditioning with an only child who goes to school all day

    Sure, this may be a lot of qualifications but we know you’re out there, only-child-parents-in-an-air-conditioned-home-while-child-goes-to-school (OCPIAACHWCGTS) and parenting is tough, so you deserve to relax and cool down on these hot days.


  1. The cook in a food truck

    Even cooking with stove tops and ovens indoors can get pretty balmy, but cooking with stove tops and ovens outdoors in a small space with likely one or to other workers in the same small space? Body heat, cooking heat, outdoors heat -- that’s a lot of heat. With stoves at temperatures higher than 150 degrees, the inside of a food truck can be anywhere from 90 to 135 degrees.
  2. Costumed character in Times Square or Coney Island or really anywhere

    This sounds terrible for a number of reasons. First, you are standing outside in the unbearable heat in a costume that can only be locking in all that heat and sweat. Second, you are expected to embody your character (Mickey? Minnie? Minion?) who likely has a little pep in their step and in this heat it is nearly impossible to have any pep in your step. On top of that, you will likely have to interact with a bunch of little munchkins running around with ice cream all over their face and hands. Finally, you will be envious of their ice cream.
  3. Subway janitor

    Those subway stops get hot and muggy. Stepping into an air conditioned train is the relief we all look forward to. MTA cleaning staff don’t get that relief. 
  4. Sewage treatment worker

    You’re removing contaminants from sewage. The job involves a lot of physical labor and on a hot day the smells of the sewage are more powerful than usual.
  5. Asphalt layerer

You’re in boots, a hard hat, pants, safety goggles, long sleeves and so on because your skin needs to be covered to avoid burns. Asphalt needs to be heated up before being applied and has to cool naturally, making the process that much longer on a hot day.