A large sink hole opened at approximately 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday in Brooklyn’s Sunset Park neighborhood on the corner of Sunset Park, on 5th Ave. and 64th St. There are no reported injuries. 

The FDNY is on the scene and tweeted a picture of the massive hole to Hell. 

It was a little over a year ago that a sinkhole opened in front of Katz’s Deli in downtown Manhattan.

“The area around East Houston and Ludlow streets were inundated at around 11 a.m. Thursday after a water main burst in front of the delicatessen, flooding its basement with more than 12 inches of water,” Metro reported last year. “Two other buildings were affected by the flooding but the city was able to shut off the water supply before noon, cutting service to the entire block of businesses — including Katz's.”

Sinkholes are caused by groundwater dissolving the earth under a house, road, or just regular old natural surface.

Or as the The Guardian puts it with their more well rounded explanation:

“Natural sinkholes – as opposed to manmade tunnel or cave collapses – occur when acidic rainwater seeps down through surface soil and sediment, eventually reaching a soluble bedrock such as sandstone, chalk, salt or gypsum, or (most commonly) a carbonate rock such as limestone beneath. In a process that can last hundreds, sometimes thousands of years, the water gradually dissolves small parts of the rock, enlarging its natural fissures and joints and creating cavities beneath.”