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A man who really hearts zombies

When Robert Kirkman talks zombies, he sounds more like a diligentstudent of such creatures than the guy who creates them for an audienceof millions.

When Robert Kirkman talks zombies, he sounds more like a diligent student of such creatures than the guy who creates them for an audience of millions.

For example, ask Kirkman if being transformed into a zombie is a fate worse than death and he replies, “I don’t really know what it’s like to be a zombie. But I’m pretty sure what it’s like to be dead: You’re dead. That’s not good, right? Being a zombie looks bad from the outside, but from the inside, it could be a great existence.

“How a zombie feels is a great mystery.”

A chap of 32 with a neat beard and an outgoing manner, Kirkman has opted against being a zombie know-it-all, despite years dwelling on them for his successful comic book, The Walking Dead, and the wildly successful AMC series of the same name that his comic inspired and that draws an average audience of 6.6 million viewers each week. As the second season unfolds, Kirkman continues to regard the zombie apocalypse at his series’ core as yet another mystery beyond his ken.

“Who knows what causes a zombie invasion? I don’t think we’ll ever find out,” he says.

“But that’s not what the show is about. Our show is about a group of people dealing with the fallout. If a zombie invasion were to really happen, they would be more interested in finding food and staying alive. They would not be busy trying to find out where the zombies came from.”

 
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