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A Simple Plan for new songs

<p>After selling more than seven million albums worldwide Simple Plan thought putting out another successful recording would be a breeze.</p>

Pop punk outfit experiments on latest album



warner music photo


Simple Plan’s self-titled album was released earlier this month.





After selling more than seven million albums worldwide Simple Plan thought putting out another successful recording would be a breeze.





But it wasn’t all that easy for the Montreal-based pop punk outfit, whose self-titled third studio album was released earlier this month.





Front man Pierre Bouvier said the group wanted to take their music to the next level. The 11 songs on the newest record are undeniably Simple Plan, but they are all very different from anything the band had done before, he said, starting with first single When I’m Gone and it’s synthesizer–infused sounds.





The R&B flavour poured into The End and the hip-hop beats that make up a good part of Generation are other good examples of the group expanding its musical roots.





“We wanted to just infuse some of those sounds you hear on the radio — a little more of hip hop or R&B — more beat orientated stuff on this album,” Bouvier told Metro. “We wanted to try to take the best elements from that world and the best elements from what we’ve had and put them together.”





The trick, he said, was to blend everything together in a way that made it seamless, without making it sound like it was just patched together in a rough way.





Simple Plan, whose members have been together since 1999, wanted to write songs that were more personal. For example, Save You deals with Bouvier’s brother’s battle with cancer.





“He never ever was depressed about it, he never moped about it and he never said ‘Why me,’” said Bouvier. “He was always ready to fight for it and always positive about the outcome even though it wasn’t going very well and doctors were saying he had a 50 per cent chance of making it.”





Watching his brother go through the battle was an eyeopener for Bouvier .





As for the intense content of the rest of the songs, Bouvier adds: “It’s a record about how we’re feeling – the challenge is to always surpass what you’ve done before. So I think that we’ve done that and we’ll see what everyone else thinks.”


 
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