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Bang Lime finds right rhythm

<p>“Need A Lift?” Three simple words, but looks like it would be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.</p>

Metric drummer, bassist build on 16-year friendship



photo courtesy last gang


Joules Scott-Key and Joshua Winstead are the duo behind Bang Lime — a moonlighting gig from their work with Metric and the fruit of a 16-year friendship.





“Need A Lift?” Three simple words, but looks like it would be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.





Sixteen years later, Joshua Winstead and Joules Scott-Key released Best Friends In Love — the debut of the duo now known as Bang Lime — but their history began in the early ‘90s when the two met in a band.





“Literally, from that day, we were friends,” says singer and guitarist Winstead. “The next day, for band practice, he (picked me up), drove me over there and after that, he’s been nice enough to pick me up and drive me around ever since.”





The decade-and-a-half between then and now has been peppered with many bands and musical pursuits — most notably and more recently, Winstead plays bass and Scott-Key’s on drums for the highly acclaimed Metric — and, with one exception, they’ve always played together. Not only that, but they did something else that would soon serve them well: “Within all the bands,” Winstead says, “we’ve always written together.”





So was Bang Lime 16 years in the making or a recent moonlighting pursuit from a hectic Metric schedule? Bit of both, says Winstead. “We wanted to do something outside of Metric and we both realized it was completely impossible to have other people be in the band because we were always having to leave,” he says of touring with Metric. “I was talking to Joules about that and he’s like, ‘Let’s just do a duo. So whenever you have to go to work, I have to go to work.’”





Winstead took up vocals and guitar, his first time fronting a band, and Scott-Key brought along the beats, and Bang Lime bore the fruit of Best Friends In Love — a stripped-down, gritty album recorded in two weeks on analog tape.





As for the band name: No, it’s not about citrus sexuality, it’s from a playful form of poetry in which random words are pulled from a hat. The odd phrase eventually came to represent musical and creative spontaneity for Winstead and Scott-Key.





“In a sense, you calculate what you want to sound like and work on your tone … but while writing, we just get together and play,” Winstead says. “When we started doing Bang Lime it was completely improvised — we sat around and goofed around. And then we just decided to write songs.”















see it live ...


  • Bang Lime plays at Lee’s Palace tonight.


 
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