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Biking for autism has unexpected pluses

<p>When Nancy Bacon learned her son had autism, it may not have changed how she felt about him but it did inspire a very long bike ride.</p>

Local woman rides for fun, family and food



Bacon





When Nancy Bacon learned her son had autism, it may not have changed how she felt about him but it did inspire a very long bike ride.





Her seven-day Western Ride for Autism will





end on Granville Street this afternoon, with two fellow cyclists, a rock-a-billy band and a documentary film crew from Toronto in tow.





“When people see we’re having so much fun, they want to get involved,” the 30-year-old financial consultant told Metro by phone. “And that’s the whole point.”





She began training six days a week in March and raised $30,000 before setting off.





While the experience has been hard on her body, all the support encountered has more than made up for a sore knee, she said. And there is at least one other benefit.





“I can eat whatever I want when I cycle eight to 10 hours a day,” she laughed from a McDonald’s in Merritt.















The rates and the symptoms


  • Autism Society Canada estimates about 1 in 200 people are autistic. Symptoms vary in their nature and intensity but generally involve impaired communication and interaction skills.


 
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