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Conspiracy theorists: Boston Marathon blasts a ‘false flag’

In a time of such devastation, believe it or not, there are people out there calling the attacks at the Boston Marathon finish line fake.

"Marathon Monday" is one of the biggest tourist days of the year in Boston. "Marathon Monday" is one of the biggest tourist days of the year in Boston.

In a time of such devastation, believe it or not, there are people out there calling the attacks at the Boston Marathon finish line fake.

During the Boston Police Department’s final press conference on Monday, Dan Bidondi, a radio host for InfoWars, asked if the attack was a “false flag” attack?[embedgallery id=135450]

“Why were the loud speakers telling people in the audience to be calm moments before the bombs went off? Is it another false flag staged attack to our civil liberties and promote homeland security while sticking their hands down our pants on the street,” he asked.[embedgallery id=135622]

“No,” responded Governor of Massachusetts, Deval Patrick.

The phrase “false flag” stems from naval warfare. Ships sailed under the flag of their nationality, but in times of war, they would sometimes change the flag to deceive other ships and plan a surprise attack.

With his question, Bidondi was asking if the government was behind the attack in order to increase its security powers.

Bidondi’s colleague, Alex Jones tweeted, “Our hearts go out to those that are hurt or killed in #Boston marathon – but this thing stinks in high heaven #falseflag”

The tweet was retweeted 578 times.

The second conspiracy comes after a photo was taken of the explosion, which shows a man standing on a roof of a building on Boylston Street. That’s literally all it is: a man standing on the roof.

The photo spread on Twitter with people urging everyone to “find this guy.”

Credit: Twitter Credit: Twitter

This is just a guy, standing on a roof. If we had rooftop access on Boylston Street, we’d probably be up there too. We assume he has a great view of the finish line. Just because a man was watching the marathon from a roof, in no way means he was in any way connected to the deadly explosions.

Let’s not drive ourselves crazy, Internet.

Follow Mary Ann Georgantopoulos on Twitter @marygeorgant

 
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