Pneumonia-stricken Hillary Clinton isn’t the only one clearing her throat. U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer stated Monday that he too was recently diagnosed with the infection.

One day following the Democratic nominee’s surprising medical revelation, Schumer, 65, told the Associated Press that he had the same diagnosis a few weeks ago.

He said he was put on antibiotics, took up a lighter schedule to recover, and is now doing just fine. A statement from Schumer’s office said that his doctor “has pronounced him all cleared up and he’s feeling much better.”

Schumer was standing next to Clinton during the 9/11 memorial service on Sunday morning when she had to make an emergency exit, feeling “overheated” and on the verge of fainting. Hours later her campaign revealed she has pneumonia, diagnosed two days earlier.

Schumer had said that Clinton “seemed fine to me” before she made her exit.

What happened immediately following Clinton’s exit is now uncertain as the New York Post reported Monday that Clinton was heading to the ER, but that her team advised her not to go in order to keep her medical condition concealed.

Citing anonymous sources, The Post reported that Clinton was en route to a state-designated Level 1 trauma center but that an aide advised a detour to her daughter Chelsea’s downtown apartment where she would have more privacy.

Despite not going to the hospital, and having a serious infection, Clinton’s acute affliction seemed improved by the afternoon when she emerged from the apartment smiling, saying that she was “feeling great,” and that it is a “beautiful day in New York.”

Pneumonia is apparently dogging the Clinton campaign, afflicting others from her camp.

"I was actually sick for a couple days, I think I had a mild form of it" campaign aide Brian Fallon said on MSNBC. "Everybody from [Campaign Manager] Robby Mook to several of the senior staff have been afflicted with some form of something or other for the last few days. That is not to be unexpected on a presidential campaign."

Pneumonia is a common lung infection that can be caused by bacteria that is spread through coughing, sneezing and breathing, according to the American Lung Association.

“Most healthy people recover from pneumonia in one to three weeks, but pneumonia can be life-threatening,” it says on ALA’s website. There are many treatments available, and the course of treatment is determined by the cause of the infection which can be viral, bacterial or fungal.