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DVD Review: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

In this belated sequel to the epochal 1980s drama, greed is no longer good -- and it's not much fun, either.

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps
20th Century Fox
**1/2

In this belated sequel to the epochal 1980s drama, greed is no longer good -- and it's not much fun, either.

Oliver Stone's film is as firmly in tune with the headlines as his original Wall Street was 23 years ago. The first film examined the capitalistic excesses of the 1980s, where firms were smashed for sport as much as for profit. The sequel takes place during the global economic meltdown of the fall of 2008.

The difference between now and then is that Stone seems far less certain about what he wants to say, and he's a lot less amusing in how he says it. The clearly defined biblical contest of the first film has been replaced by a blurry battle of pygmies.

Michael Douglas’ rapacious trader Gordon Gekko is back, emerging from eight years in prison for financial crimes committed in the first film. He's a lonely man, whose daughter Winnie (Carey Mulligan) refuses to see him, but he's not a broken one.

He’s busily hustling his memoirs, and looking to score big dough again, thanks in part to the hustle of Shia LaBeouf's Jake Moore, a young corporate trader ripe for the taking. Problem: Jake is involved with Winnie.

LaBeouf is the movie’s dramatic centre. At 24, he’s one of America's best young actors, especially when he gets the right role, as he has here. The story often flags, but he never does.

Extras include a director’s commentary, a conversation with Stone and his cast, plus featurettes about the real Wall Street.

 
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