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Get the shout out

<p>Try to envision a mix of trance, ‘80s synth pop and hard rock and you’re still far from a good description of Shout Out Out Out Out. Try picturing hundreds in a dark, sweaty room going completely insane, and you’re in the ballpark.</p>

Dance rockers play for people who ‘want to get down’



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Shout Out Out Out Out live shows often send audiences into a frenzy.



Try to envision a mix of trance, ‘80s synth pop and hard rock and you’re still far from a good description of Shout Out Out Out Out. Try picturing hundreds in a dark, sweaty room going completely insane, and you’re in the ballpark.


Along with the modest underground success of first full-length release Not Saying/Just Saying, the high-tempo live shows are part of the reason this six-person outfit is leading a hotly discussed (NOW, Exclaim, See magazine), post-grunge charge out of their native Edmonton. Featuring a vocoder, samplers, octopads, five synthesizers, four bass guitars and two drummers stacked with their vistalite sets on a giant scaffold, Shout Out Out Out Out envelops club-goers with a ribald brand of robotic-voiced dance tunes.


That’s not to say Clint Frazier, Jason Troock, Will Zimmerman, Lyle Bell, Gravy and producer Nik Kozub don’t like to rock. Before they started to get people cutting rugs in July 2004, Shout members Bell and Gravy had (and still infrequently do under the handle Whitey Houston) garage-pop gigs going that they eventually got bored with, prompting the style change.


“We eventually got tired of guitars,” Shout drummer Gravy says. “It was time for something new. And dance music was the perfect out for us, pardon the pun … We started a soundtrack for a rock climbing movie which ended up not being used. So we released it and it was well received. It was something different and people dug it.”


Don’t assume that just because it’s dance music that it’s restricted to IROC drivers with slick hair or the pacifier-sucking crowd. The Shouts pull influence from a number of sources (The Bronx and Justice to name a couple) to fuse together gritty electric rhythms that send crowds at their critically acclaimed shows into a frenzy.


“It’s controlled mayhem,” Gravy says. “We like dirty, grungy dance music. We want to rock out and dance out, and we play to people who want to get down. We start up and sooner or later, everyone in the crowd is going bananas.”


• Shout Out Out Out Out opens for Holy Fuck at the Mod Club on Friday.


 
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