The limited liability company was first offered as an option for structuring businesses 40 years ago in Wyoming. By the late 1990s, all states had laws authorizing the organizing of businesses under the hybrid structure. Today, LLCs are growing faster than any other business type, according to the IRS.

An LLC is a business structure that combines the simplicity, flexibility and tax advantages of a partnership with the liability protection of a corporation. An LLC can have one or many “members,” the official term for its owners. Members can be individuals or other businesses, and there is no limit to the number of members an LLC can have.

About 2.4 million U.S. businesses identified as LLCs in 2014, according to the latest figures available from the IRS. Take a look at these advantages and disadvantages to help you decide whether an LLC is the right structure for your business.

Choosing to structure your business as an LLC offers a number of advantages:

Members aren’t personally liable for actions of the company. This means that the members’ personal assets — homes, cars, bank accounts, investments — are protected from creditors seeking to collect from the business. This protection remains in place so long as you run your business on the up-and-up and keep business and personal financials separate. (More on this later.)

Unless it opts otherwise, an LLC is a pass-through entity, meaning its profits go directly to its members without being taxed by the government on the company level. Instead, they’re taxed on members’ federal income tax returns. This makes filing taxes easier than if your business were taxed on the corporate level. And if your business loses money, you and other members can shoulder the hit on your returns and lower your tax burdens.

An LLC can opt to be managed by its members, which allows all owners to share in the business’s day-to-day decision-making, or by managers, who can be either members or outsiders. This is helpful if members aren’t experienced in running a business and want to hire people who are. In many states, an LLC is member-managed by default unless explicitly stated otherwise in filings with the secretary of state or the equivalent agency.

Initial paperwork and fees for an LLC are relatively light, though there is wide variation in what states charge in fees and taxes. For example, Arizona’s filing fee for articles of organization is $50, while the fee in Illinois is $500. These variations aside, the process is simple enough for owners to handle without special expertise, though it’s a good idea to consult a lawyer or an accountant for help. Ongoing requirements usually come on an annual basis.

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Before registering your business as an LLC, consider these possible drawbacks:

In a court proceeding, a judge can rule that your LLC structure doesn’t protect your personal assets. The action is called “piercing the corporate veil,” and you can be at risk for it if, for example, you don’t clearly separate business transactions from personal, or if you’ve been shown to have run the business fraudulently in ways that resulted in losses for others.

By default, the IRS considers LLCs the same as partnerships for tax purposes, unless members opt to be taxed as a corporation. If your LLC is taxed as a partnership, the government considers members who work for the business to be self-employed. This means those members are personally responsible for paying Social Security and Medicare taxes, which are collectively known as self-employment tax and based on the business’s total net earnings.

On the other hand, if your LLC files forms with the IRS to be taxed as an S corporation, you and other owners who work for the company pay Social Security and Medicare taxes only on actual compensation, not the whole of the company’s pretax profits.

In many states, if a member leaves the company, goes bankrupt or dies, the LLC must be dissolved and the remaining members are responsible for all remaining legal and financial obligations necessary to terminate the business. These members can still do business, of course; they’ll just have to start a whole new LLC from scratch.

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Andrew L. Wang is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: awang@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @andrew_L_wang. NerdWallet writer Claire Tsosie contributed to this article.

For more information on how to start a small business, check out our Small Business Guide.

Updated March 6, 2017.

The article LLC: Pros and Cons of a Limited Liability Company originally appeared on NerdWallet.