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New class set to launch

<p>CIC has announced it intends to implement the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) this summer, which will, no doubt, put a dent in our antiquated Federal Skilled Workers Class (FSWC).</p>




CIC has announced it intends to implement the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) this summer, which will, no doubt, put a dent in our antiquated Federal Skilled Workers Class (FSWC).





For years, Canada has been selecting its skilled workers through a points system designed to assess a foreigner’s ability to become successfully established here.





The system is entirely speculative since we don’t really know whether successful candidates will actually find work here.





In contrast, Canadian universities and colleges are attracting foreign students who pay full fare to get an education here and to get a one-year post-graduate work permit. What do we do with them then? We send them packing not­with­standing their proven employability here.





Similarly, some foreign workers who are establish­ed here, albeit temporarily, can’t seem to score 67 points under the FSWC, which should theoretically pass them.





The current system favours a person from abroad whose employability is speculative over a person who is already working and paying taxes here.





The CEC may soon change that. The feds initially promised to deliver “25,000 Canadian-educated foreign students and skilled workers” in this category, however, only 10,000 to 12,000 are now being promised in 2008.





CIC confirmed that “wait times for Federal Skilled Workers will likely increase at some overseas missions” with implementation of the CEC.





A recently-obtained draft CIC discussion paper proposes that:




  • All applicants must have legally come to Canada to work or study and must have valid temporary status, but not necessarily be employed;



  • All applicants will be given priority processing in Buffalo but may be landed within Canada;



  • Graduates must have a Canadian post-secondary credential while foreign workers need a second­ary school diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship;



  • Recent graduates need one year full-time Canadian work experience while foreign workers need two.



These criteria are not final and should not yet be treated as such.




metro@migrationlaw.com





Guidy Mamann practises law in Toronto at Mamann & Associates and is certified by the Law Society of Upper Canada as an immigration specialist. Reach him confidentially at 416-862-0000 or at metro@migrationlaw.com.

 
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