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Ninteenth century building at heart of relocation talks

Talks are underway to save the former office of Halifax’s first chief surveyor, Charles Morris, from the wrecking ball.

Talks are underway to save the former office of Halifax’s first chief surveyor, Charles Morris, from the wrecking ball.


According to a release issued yesterday by the Ecology Action Centre, the plan is to relocate the 19th-century apartment building that sits on the corner of Hollis and Morris streets to the Nova Scotia Power parking lot adjacent to the site by uprooting the structure by lifting it from its foundation.


But NSP spokesman David Rodenhiser said "the Ecology Action Centre overstated the state of discussions” in the release.


“We are collaborating to work out the details, but right now those negotiations aren’t done," Rodenhiser said.


Thom Oommen, a researcher with the Ecology Action Centre, said things are moving fast and they are working under the impression they will be able to move the structure to the empty lot.


In late September, Halifax Regional Council gave the nod of approval to Dexel Developments to build a 10-storey commercial and residential building in its place.


A second building, the Rhuland House at 1267 Hollis St., may also be moved, but it is unknown at this point whether both buildings will be saved, Oommen said.

 
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