Home
 
Choose Your City
Change City

Siblings hope complaint will keep other terminally ill people from losing children

LETHBRIDGE, Alberta - Almost four years after Monica Pomahac-Lansing's young children were taken from her by police as she lay dying from cancer, her sister hopes her death can be used to help teach officers how to treat terminally ill people with compassion and care.

LETHBRIDGE, Alberta - Almost four years after Monica Pomahac-Lansing's young children were taken from her by police as she lay dying from cancer, her sister hopes her death can be used to help teach officers how to treat terminally ill people with compassion and care.

Andrea Glover testified yesterday at the second day of a provincial Law Enforcement Review Board hearing.

She and two other siblings allege Lethbridge police acted inappropriately in August 2005 when they helped the children's uncle take them from their mother's home under a custody order.

Pomahac-Lansing died the next day.

Glover says the officers were rude and aggressive and shouldn't have enforced an order which gave custody to the children's father, Frank Lansing, because he wasn't present.

Lawyer Grant Stapon, who is acting for the police, has said the officers acted properly in an extremely difficult domestic situation.

 
Consider AlsoFurther Articles