STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Daniel Ek, co-founder of Swedish music streaming service Spotify which has the biggest paid subscriber base in the world, said on Thursday he had no intention of selling the company.

While investors believe privately owned Spotify is probably heading for a public listing, some industry analysts see the loss-making company as a takeover target for a larger tech giant with deeper pockets.

"My selfish ambition with Spotify is just trying to show ... that we can create one of those super companies here in Europe," he told journalists at the symposium Brilliant Minds, which aims to bring artists and musicians together with the tech community.

Asked if that meant he was not up for selling the firm, Ek said: "I'm not going to sell, no."

Spotify, founded in 2006, pays more than 80 percent of its revenue to record labels and artists and has not yet shown a profit as it spends to grow internationally. It competes in a business crowded with formidable rivals such as Apple Music, Google Music and YouTube.

Many other European tech start-ups have been swallowed up by bigger Silicon Valley competitors.

Ek said Silicon Valley got an earlier start in building up its tech giants but that Europe finally has the right conditions to support its own entrepreneurs.

"For the first time now there's an ecosystem around it with capital and experience that can actually help guide entrepreneurs," he said.

"The number one advice I tell everyone is 'don't sell', because that's the biggest problem we have. All these things could grow gigantic if you just kept the course and kept doing what you're doing," he added.

Last year Spotify made an operating loss of 184.5 million euros ($205 million), widening from 165.1 million in 2014.

Spotify, whose investors include Northzone, DST Global and Accel, does not disclose details about its ownership but the co-founders no longer own a majority, having sold off stakes.

(Reporting by Mia Shanley; Editing by Ruth Pitchford)