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The children’s stories

No child should ever have to see a parent suffer — but breast cancer is a heartless disease.

Cancer brought us closer

Corinne Weldon
Corinne was 7 years old when her mother, Sue Weldon, was diagnosed with breast cancer.

“When I was first told, I was too young, and I had no idea what breast cancer was. It was a very confusing time. Nothing changed much, but I noticed small things, like my mom wasn’t in the gym and was always resting.

I remember the first time I felt scared and afraid for my mom was when I went to see her at the hospital and she just didn’t look good. My brothers and my dad were there to help me with stuff when mom couldn’t. I was lucky to have them there to help me out. Once life had gotten back to normal, I realized how much closer we had all become.

Now I look back on that time, I see how much it affected me without my noticing. Mom has been clear for six years now, but if she were to have it now, I would be terrified. But we were all here for each other, and that counts.”

I?grew up more quickly


Jenna Jackson
Jenna was 18 when her mother was diagnosed with stage II ­­­­breast cancer. She’s now 24 and working as a program coordinator at the Living Beyond Breast Cancer organization.


“I was away at college when my mom was diagnosed. She was due in for a mastectomy right after my exams. It was so hard being at home and seeing her lose her hair and slowly turn into a different person.


I remember it all as a very confusing time. Mom is a very strong person, and I think that gave us more hope than we would have had otherwise. I saw her through different eyes when she was undergoing her treatment. The impact it had on her is that she knows never to underestimate the people in your life. The impact on me was that I grew up more quickly. When you’re 18 and in college, you think your mom will always be there.


Now, as a family, we value every day of our lives.


Live every day to the maximum


Chloe Kangalee
Chloe was 7 when her mom was diagnosed with breast cancer for the first time. She was 17 when she was diagnosed a second time. She is now 23 and a student.

“My worst memories are of her being sick, putting on weight and losing all the hair on her body, but she put so much energy into staying positive and fighting back. Ten years later, she was diagnosed for the second time and burst into tears when she told me. It was almost like she had been defeated. She was far more scared because she had been so adamant she would beat it the first time. She ended up resigned to the fact that dying of breast cancer may well be her fate and was a lot more emotional. My mom and I are best friends and we’ve been through so much together. Growing up seeing your mom be so sick makes you realize just how fragile life is — but resilient as well. You have to live each day as much as you can.”



 
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