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What you need to know about Trump’s presidential inauguration

This will be America's 58th Presidential Inauguration.
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    President Barack Obama's inauguration in January, 2009.|Wikimedia Commons

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    Bill Clinton, 1997|Wikimedia Commons

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    George H. W. Bush, 1989|Wikimedia Commons

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    Jimmy Carter, 1977|Wikimedia Commons

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    Lyndon Johnson is sworn in as the 36th president of the United States on November |Wikimedia Commons

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    JFK, 1961|Wikimedia Commons

In mere days, Donald Trump will be sworn in as America’s 45th president on Jan. 20, 2017.

That Friday, he will take the oath of office, administered by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, according to usa.gov: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

In case you are counting down the days, there is a website set up for the 58th Presidential Inauguration — www.inaugural.senate.gov — with details on the day’s events and history on past inaugurations.

RELATED:These Democrats are boycotting Trump's inauguration

As of now, usa.gov suggests connecting theoffice of your local senator or congress member, if you would like to order tickets to the swearing-in ceremony.

The day’s events will include a morning worship service, procession to the Capitol for the swearing-in, swearing-in of the vice president, the president’s swearing-in, the inaugural address, departure of the outgoing president, inaugural luncheon, inaugural parade and inaugural ball.

There is no telling how long President-elect Trump’s speech will be, but likelylonger than the shortest inaugural address — by our first president, George Washington, at only 135 words. Sworn in on April 30, 1789, Washington’s ceremony took place in Trump’s hometown of New York City. The first president to have his inauguration in D.C. was Thomas Jefferson in March 4, 1801.

RELATED:Jeers and cheers welcome Trump's inauguration as demonstrators plan events across US

Now, the ceremony is held much earlier in the year, and has a much bigger audience — with those not only watching from the Capitol, but also from TVs and smartphones across America and the world.

Click here for where to watch and live stream information

Part of that audience will also be protesting Trump, as they have been since he was elected the next president.

Protests forTrump’s inauguration ceremony on Jan. 20are already being planned, while a “Million Women March” is also being called for Jan. 21 in Washington, D.C., and more cities, the day after the inauguration.

There has also been controversy around who will be performing at the inauguration, typically an event that gardners top acts. But Trump has been reportedly having a hard time securing top talent.

As of Jan. 16, here is who is secured to perform:

  • The marching band for Talladega College
  • The Rockettes
  • The Mormon Tabernacle Choir
  • Jackie Evancho
  • Toby Keith
  • 3 Doors Down


Trump will become president in less than 24 hours

 

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