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This happened: Atlantic City prepared for its SOS, a killer's home was condemned and so were deadly child diseases, Washington State planned an older smoking age and the habit got pricey for a Singapore smoker
Joe Luccathetti(L) andRobert Fitting, employees of the Revel Casino Hotel remove signREUTERS/Tom Mihalek

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The New Jersey governor made plans to raise the fortunes of Atlantic City, while Newtown’s council voted to raze Sandy Hook killer’s home.

Young lives were on course to be saved as the Gates planned to kill off deadly diseases and Washington State suggested raising the legal smoking age to 21. A cigarette addict was given a smoking-hot fine for flicking butts out of his window.

Atlantic City awaited a new manager to tackle its economic crisis

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With four out of 12 casinos closing last year, Atlantic City’s fortunes are on the slide. New Jersey’s governor is said to be announcing the appointment today of an emergency leader to drag the ailing gambling hub from its current financial fixes.

READ MORE: Atlantic City to get emergency manager to tackle financial crisis

The Sandy Hook killer’s home was condemned

Lawmakers in Newtown, where pupils and teachers were killed in the horrific shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, have resolved to demolish the home of gunman Adam Lanza. The school has already been demolished.

READ MORE:Newtown council votes to demolish Sandy Hook school killer's home

Fatal child diseases were set to be cured

By 2030, cures could be found for deadly diseases including polio, river blindness, guinea worm and malaria, halving the number of child deaths worldwide, according to a report by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The report by the world’s wealthiest foundationalso predicts that Africa will be able to feed itself, rather than rely on imports, a fairly ambitious goal.

READ MORE:Child deaths halved in 15 years as deadly diseases eradicated, say Gates

Washington State planned to stamp out early smoking

If Washington State goes ahead with plans to raise the legal age for smoking to 21, it would be the first U.S. state to do so. Under the measure, the state would stand to lose about $20 million a year in tax revenue, but that could be clawed back in a reduction in healthcare costs. Smoking currently kills 8,300 in the state each year, and contributes to $2.8 billion in healthcare costs.

READ MORE:Washington State could be first to raise legal smoking age from 18 to 21

A litterbug smoker was slapped with a hefty fine

A Singapore smoker probably wished he had never taken up the habit after being fined a colossal $15,000 dollars after idly flicking cigarette butts out of his apartment window. State CCTV in the ultra-clean city-state, which has famously banned the import of street-messing chewing gum, had tracked the criminal as he tossed 34 dead-ends in four days.

READ MORE:Singapore smoker fined $15,000 for throwing butts out of flat window

 
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