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White House website en español not available; Admin says it's a work-in-progress

"We've got the I.T. folks working overtime," the White House press secretary said.
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The issue"climate change" and a page for the LGBT community disappeared from the White House website afterPresident Donald Trump took his oath of office on Friday, but another missing link is the White Houseen español option.

The new WhiteHouse.gov does not offer a Spanish-language version of the site as it did when presidents Obama and Bush were in office.

"As you know, we hit the ground running on day one. There was a lot to do and we had done a lot of work on the website to make sure that we were prepared to get as much information up as fast as possible," White House spokesman Sean Spicer said at a news conference on Monday."We are continuing to build out the website, both in the issue areas and then that area.

"But we've got the I.T. folks working overtime right now to continue to get all of that up to speed. And trust me, it's just going to take a little bit more time, but we're working piece by piece to get that done."

RELATED:Trump's press spokesman promises reporters 'never to lie'

Spicer did not say when the website would be fully up and functioning.

Under the U.S. Constitution, there is no official language for the nation, but Spanish is often a common option as the population of Spanish-speakers grows.

As of 2015, the Hispanic population of the United States was 56.6 million, although it is not noted how many are solely Spanish speakers. People of Hispanic origin are the nation's largest ethnic population groupmaking up 17.6 percent of the country's total population, according to census data.

Hispanics are no longer the fastest growing ethnic or racial group. In 2016, the Pew Research Center reported that the growth of the Latino population has fallen behind the Asian influx, which grew an average of 3.4 percent annually between 2007 and 2014.

 

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