Favorite authors reveal their favorite books of 2012

One of John Irving's favorite books this year was “Jack Holmes and His Friend” by Edmund White.

Some of our favorite authors discuss their favorite books of 2012.



John Irving: “Jack Holmes and His Friend” by Edmund White

“What I admire most about ‘Jack Holmes and His Friend’ is the seamlessness of the shifts in point of view and narrative voice.  It is a novel about the friendship between a gay man and his straight friend, and it is not only written from each of their points of view; it is written in both the third person and the first person.  I find that very hard to do, but Edmund makes it look easy.”

-John Irving is the author of “In One Person”



Peter Ames Carlin: “Truth Like the Sun” by Jim Lynch

“Set in the Seattles of 1962 and 2001, Lynch’s novel tracks his characters through decades of civic idealism, corruption, death and rebirth. His darkly hilarious portrait of modern journalism is alone worth the price of admission.”

-Peter Ames Carlin is author of the Bruce Springsteen biography, “Bruce”

Alan Light: “The One: The Life and Music of James Brown” by R.J. Smith

“This was an ambitious, comprehensive, and long-overdue biography of a towering figure in music across the globe. “

-Alan Light is author of “The Holy or the Broken: Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley, and the Unlikely Ascent of ‘Hallelujah’”

Stephen Davis: “Moments Captured” by Robert J. Seidman

“It’s a novel about Eadweard Muybridge. This is the guy who invented the moving image. He completely changed the way that humanity sees itself. Edison took it and ran with it, and changed it from something mechanical to something chemical. But this novel is an evocation of a very pivotal time in the history of the moving image, between two-dimensional still image and image that actually moved.

-Stephen Davis is author of “More Room in a Broken Heart: The True Adventures of Carly Simon.”



Chris Cleave: “The Shadow of the Banyan” by Vaddey Ratner;  “The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers

“2012 has been a strikingly good year for debut fiction, with almost every month announcing the arrival of a major talent. If I am to single out two novels from this vintage crop, I would choose Vaddey Ratner’s sublime In ‘The Shadow of the Banyan’ – a beautiful and heart-rending take on the Cambodian genocide – and Kevin Powers’ ‘The Yellow Birds’, chronicling one soldier’s harrowing experience of war in Iraq. Both writers draw deeply on their own experience, bringing a hard-won wisdom to which their literary gift is equal. This is the novel at its best, taking us far beyond the ordinary for a few hours and leaving us spooked and exhilarated.”

-Chris Cleave is the author of “Gold”

Edmund White: “In One Person” by John Irving

“John Irving’s ‘In One Person’ is a gripping, completely readable tale fashioned by a straight man’s effort to imagine himself into several marginal sexualities. I loved an earlier book, a thriller ‘In Search of Klingsor’ by Jorge Volpi about a young physicist in 1945 rounding up Hitler’s top nuclear scientists. During four days of blackout due to Sandy I read Willa Cather’s inspiring ‘Song of the Lark’ by flashlight.” -Edmund White is the author of “Jack Holmes and His Friend”

 





News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

Apple says its systems not to blame for…

By Edwin Chan and Christina FarrSAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - The week before a crucial launch of its new iPhone, Apple Inc said intimate photos of…

Local

Tallest residential building planned for lower Manhattan

A residential tower planned for lower Manhattan will soar 1,356 feet in the air -- just 12 feet shy of 1 World Trade Center. When…

Local

Bronx man commits suicide by decapitation

A Bronx man committed suicide Monday morning in the Hunts Point area of the Bronx by decapitating himself. According to the NYPD, the 51-year-old man…

Local

Top cops enroll in Twitter course at John…

NYPD officers are reportedly getting a lesson on the best way to use 140 characters or less. The New York Post reported Tuesday top officers…

Arts

Pop culture and prostitutes: New Toulouse-Lautrec exhibit at…

Henri Toulouse-Lautrec documented the cult of celebrity and the rise of pop entertainment in his prints, posters and lithographs — now on display at MoMA.

Arts

PHOTO: Extreme artist Eskil Ronningsbakken balances unicycle on…

Extreme artist’ Eskil Ronningsbakken balances on the edge of a cliff face at 4,600 feet – on a unicycle. The Norwegian travels across the globe, balancing over vertiginous ravines, tall…

Music

Hear two previously unreleased Adele songs

Missing some Adele in your life? Two previously unreleased songs from the singer have appeared online.

Music

Lincoln Center just made 'Lord of the Rings'…

Middle Earth already has sweeping vistas, a hero's journey and technology-revolutionizing special effects. But next April, the Lincoln Center will add another dimension to Peter Jackson's…

NFL

Antonio Allen returns to practice after concussion

Antonio Allen was cleared to practice again following his concussion two weeks ago.

Sports

Belinda Bencic leads crop of young stars serving…

Belinda Bencic, a 17-year-old Swiss Miss, beat two Top-10 players before suffering a disappointing loss Tuesday in the quarterfinals.

MLB

MLB Power Rankings: Angels take control, Tigers and…

MLB Power Rankings: Angels take control, Tigers and Giants climb

Sports

Novak Djokovic feeds off US Open crowd to…

Novak Djokovic isn't a native New Yorker, but he sure knows how to use the U.S. Open crowd to his advantage.

Parenting

In defense of making a mess during playtime

"Recipes for Play" authors Rachel Sumner and Ruth Mitchener think playtime should involve the five senses and making a mess is part of the fun.

Wellbeing

Jason Hope helps push anti-aging efforts forward

Reporter was commissioned to write this in-depth article When it comes to age-related illness, the direction of modern medicine seems more reactive than proactive. In…

Wellbeing

Today's Doomsday preppers: a closer look at survivalist…

Reporter was commissioned to write this in-depth article. The term “Doomsday prepper” is often associated with the paranoid, anti-government stereotype of the 1990s. The truth…

Education

These college students think breakfast is the most…

  It should be no surprise that the city that never sleeps is also home to the most students who like to order food in…