Tech experts tie WikiLeaks soldier to database breach

 

FORT MEADE, MD - FEBRUARY 23:  Army Private Bradley Manning is escorted away from his Article 32 hearing February 23, 2012 in Fort Meade, Maryland. During the hearing, Manning deferred his plea to the 22 charges against him and deferred a decision over whether he wanted a military judge or a jury to hear his case.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Army Private Bradley Manning is escorted away from his Article 32 hearing.

Computer forensic experts testified on Monday that they traced a break-in to a secret U.S. government website to Bradley Manning, the U.S. soldier charged with the biggest leak of classified files in the nation’s history.

The testimony came as the court-martial of the private first class entered its second week. Manning is accused of providing more than 700,000 secret files to anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while serving in Iraq in 2009 and 2010.

He faces 21 charges, including aiding the enemy, and could face life in prison without parole if convicted in the case, which has raised questions about the limits of openness and secrecy in the digital age.

Government witnesses told the court-martial that they had traced breaches of the U.S. government’s secret Intelink intelligence database to Manning’s user name and Internet Protocol address, a major step in proving that Manning orchestrated the release of documents including secret diplomatic cables.

Manning, now 25, was a low-level intelligence analyst when he released the documents to WikiLeaks, a move he said was intended to provoke a more robust debate in the United States on the military and foreign policy. U.S. officials said the breach put lives at risk.

In written testimony, National Security Agency contractor Steven Buchanan said that computer “audit logs” showed secret Intelink information “was successfully accessed” by Manning in 2009 and 2010.

David Shaver, another computer expert who worked as a government contractor, also testified that large amounts of classified information were downloaded from Intelink and traced to Manning’s computer.

Defense attorney David Coombs tried to cast doubt on whether all of the unauthorized computer use attributed to Manning could have been done by him.

Some of the more than 800 Internet searches from Manning’s computer could have resulted from malfunctioning equipment and activity by other persons, Coombs said.

“You don’t know who did those searches,” Coombs said while questioning Shaver.

“Correct,” he answered

Manning was arrested in May 2010. He was charged with downloading intelligence documents, diplomatic cables and combat videos and forwarding them to WikiLeaks.

His trial is ramping up as officials are searching for more details about an ex-CIA employee who leaked details of a top secret U.S. surveillance program in which security services monitored data about Americans’ phone calls and internet usage.

 


News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
National

U.S. soldier convicted of WikiLeaks crimes granted name…

By Carey Gillam(Reuters) - Former U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, who is serving 35 years in prison for turning over classified files to WikiLeaks, can exchange…

Local

NYPD #myNYPD Twitter campaign backfires

A NYPD campaign to improve its image via social media instead produced a flood of pictures of police brutality and tweets critical of the force.

International

PHOTOS: Places to visit on Shakespeare's 450th birthday

William Shakespeare would celebrate his 450th birthday on Wednesday, and England's greatest playwright let his imagination roam as widely as his characters.

Local

Overnight Q trains to run local in Manhattan…

Manhattan straphangers will soon get some late-night relief on the Q train.

Books

A debut novel about fate, love and moving…

Pia Padukone talks about her debut novel, "Where Earth Meets Water."

Movies

Review: 'The Railway Man' is a literal-minded look…

In "The Railway Man," Colin Firth plays a WWII vet suffering from massive trauma acquired from his days as a beaten POW.

Books

'#GIRLBOSS': Nasty Gal CEO shares unlikely success story

Nasty Gal CEO Sophia Amoruso shares her rags to riches, dumpster to Porsche tale in her new book "#GIRLBOSS."

Movies

App Appeal: Unf— Your Habitat is a sweary…

Guilt trip yourself into some spring cleaning with the app "Unf— Your Habitat," which uses swearing and some rudeness to get you to get your s— together.

NFL

Jets announce they will return to Cortland for…

The tradition of holding camp in Cortland began in 2009 when Rex Ryan wanted to get his Jets away from the distractions of New York City.

NHL

Rangers reclaim home ice with Game 3 road…

The Rangers jumped out to a 2-0 lead early in the first period for the second straight game. This time, they held on.

NBA

Nets settle for 1-1 series tie with Game…

DeMar DeRozan, who was an All-Star this season, hit two huge jumpers back-to-back to give the Raptors an 89-85 lead over the Nets with 2:10 to play.

MLB

MLB Power Rankings: Brewers best in baseball, Dodgers,…

MLB Power Rankings: Brewers best in baseball, Dodgers, Cardinals, Yankees surge. The A's, Braves, Rangers, Giants and Rockies are also in the top 10.

Tech

App Appeal: Unf— Your Habitat is a sweary…

Guilt trip yourself into some spring cleaning with the app "Unf— Your Habitat," which uses swearing and some rudeness to get you to get your s— together.

Education

The benefits and challenges of intensive summer programs

Get the facts on taking an advanced college course.

Wellbeing

Why you need a facial

What can a facial do for your face that a washcloth and soap can’t?

Wellbeing

You can have your healthy snacks delivered

To take the guesswork out of procuring snacks good for you and your family, check out one of these companies.