Afghanistan runs out of ballot papers as election turnout surprises

fghan women stand in line while waiting for their turn to vote at a polling station in Mazar-i-sharif. Credit: Reuters
fghan women stand in line while waiting for their turn to vote at a polling station in Mazar-i-sharif.
Credit: Reuters

Afghanistan’s landmark election on Saturday was marred by a shortage of ballot papers that left many voters still queuing to cast their vote with polling due to close, as the organizers appeared unprepared for a high turnout.

The Independent Election Commission ordered voting to be extended by at least an hour, with ballot papers being dispatched where they were needed for people to vote for a successor to President Hamid Karzai.

Organizers of the vote – meant to be the first democratic handover of power in Afghan history – had feared that a low turnout and Taliban violence would derail the election but as polling stations began to close, those fears had not materialized.

“People did not expect this number of people to come out to vote,” Toryalai Wesa, governor of the southern city of Kandahar, told reporters. “They though the turnout would be similar to the past and that’s why they sent fewer voting materials this time.”

In the capital, Kabul, many polling stations decided to extend voting hours way beyond the official closing time of 4 p.m. (1130 GMT) to allow voters to cast their ballots.

In the western Dasht-e-Barchi neighborhood of Kabul a line of hundreds of men and women snaked outside one polling station, with many impatient voters saying they had been waiting in the rain for most of the day.

“I have waited here for hours, but was not allowed inside to vote because there is no ballot paper,” said Hassan, who only gave his first name, as others nodded in agreement. “This is a deprivation of my right and I am unhappy at not being able to take part in this historic process.”

Many polling stations in Kabul decided to extend voting way beyond the official closing time of 4 p.m. (1130 GMT) to allow voters to cast their ballots.

Mohammad Hashimi, an election observer, added: “Many people stood in the rain for hours but couldn’t vote because of the ballot papers.”

Ahmad Yusuf Nuristani, chairman of the Independent Election Commission, told reporters that signs were that the turnout was good, while acknowledging the foul up over ballot papers.

“The report we have so far indicates that many people participated in these elections and even in some stations we ran out of ballot papers,” he said. “We have already sent some ballots to those stations which we had reserved in provinces.”

Of the eight candidates contesting the presidency, the three frontrunners to succeed Karzai – who is barred by the constitution from running again – are former foreign ministers Abdullah Abdullah and Zalmay Rassoul and former finance minister Ashraf Ghani.

A smooth election with a high turnout is good news for Afghanistan’s Western backers who are watching the vote closely in order to decide whether to continue to extend billions of aid desperately needed to support Afghanistan’s ailing economy.

It was not immediately clear how widespread the shortage of ballot papers was around the country. Afghanistan has 12 million eligible voters, and officials say there were 15 million ballot papers printed.

In Kandahar, a Taliban stronghold and Afghanistan’s second city, ballots had run out at the majority of polling stations in the city, according to a spokesman for the governor’s office.

“Due to the mismanagement of election commission in Kandahar, voting materials in the majority of polling stations have run out,” said Dawakhan Menapal, the spokesman.

One young, angry voter, Mohammad, said he was upset because he was unable to vote.

“I came here at 8 a.m. to this polling station to select our candidate, it’s 11:30 and the election workers has told us that the election papers have run out and you should go to a different polling station,” he said. “People have crushed their voting cards and thrown them away.”

There was no official on turnout, but at the last election in 2009, the turnout of 4.6 million was regarded as low.

Because of Afghanistan’s difficult terrain, it will take weeks for officials to gather ballot boxes from around the country and count the votes. Official preliminary results from the Saturday vote are not expected until late April.



News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

MAP: New York City Street Closures August 22,…

The Percy Sutton Harlem 5K and NYC Family Health Walk-a-thon and Pakistan Day Parade and Fair will cause traffic delays and street closures in New York City this weekend. Plan…

International

U.N. nuclear inquiry on Iran seen making slow…

The U.N. nuclear watchdog appears to have made only limited progress so far in getting Iran to answer questions about its suspected atomic bomb research, diplomatic sources said on Friday,…

National

Violence-weary Missouri town sees second night of calm

By Nick Carey and Carey GillamFERGUSON Mo. (Reuters) - The violence-weary town of Ferguson, Missouri, saw a second straight evening of relative calm on Thursday…

National

Journalist James Foley's parents, after call with pope,…

The parents of James Foley, the American journalist killed by Islamic State militants in Iraq, on Friday called for prayer and support to free the remaining captives held by Islamic…

Television

Recap: 'The Knick,' Season 1, Episode 3, 'The…

The third episode of Steven Soderbergh's "The Knick" finds Dr. Thackery (Clive Owen) meeting an old flame and other characters embracing self-destruction.

Music

Webcast: Watch Polyphonic Spree live on Sunday Aug.…

Polyphonic Spree singer Tim DeLaughter sits with Metro Music Editor Pat Healy for a chat and then the big band performs live. It begins on Sunday at 9:30 pm

Movies

Matthew Weiner on directing 'Are You Here' and…

"Mad Men" creator Matthew Weiner discusses his movie "Are You Here," his history writing comedy and the tiny movie he directed in 1996 you can't see.

Movies

Michael Chiklis on his football past and 'When…

Michael Chiklis remembers playing football in high school and how that prepped him to play a coach in "When the Game Stands Tall."

NFL

Fantasy football draft guide: How to draft your…

Many are wondering if we’re entering a new age in fantasy football drafting — one where running backs take a backseat.

NFL

Jets vs. Giants: 3 Giants storylines to watch

The Giants have plenty to work on as they reach the dress rehearsal preseason game Friday night against the rival Jets.

NFL

Jets vs. Giants: 3 Jets storylines to watch

Metro looks at three Jets storylines to watch as they play the Giants Friday.

NFL

Giants expected to work Corey Washington into first-team…

The day of reckoning for the Giants' fringe players will fall upon them Friday night against the Jets.

Sex

Big weddings may lead to long-term happiness

Dreaming of a big wedding? A new study indicates that the longer your guest list, the happier you’ll be in the long run. l A…

Sex

Online dating for every generation

Frank Jackson and his mother Maggie are like lots of modern families: They have dinner together regularly, keep each other updated on their lives —…

Wellbeing

Going green could be the key to getting…

If we could just pursue the things that would actually make us happy, we could help the environment too, according to a New York researcher.…

Tech

Siren: A new dating app that puts women…

Online dating can be brutal, especially for single women. Noting that many women hate wading through inappropriate messages and photos, two tech entrepreneurs decided to…