Chinese ship detects pulse while searching for Malaysian plane

Relative of  passenger on board Malaysia Airlines MH370 puts message on board dedicated to passengers in Beijing
A relative of a passenger on board Malaysia Airlines MH370 puts her message on a message board dedicated to the passengers at the Lido Hotel in Beijing.
Credit: Reuters

A Chinese patrol ship hunting for a missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner detected a pulse signal in the south Indian Ocean on Saturday, state news agency Xinhua reported, in a possible indicator of the underwater beacon from a plane’s “black box”.

A black box detector deployed by the vessel Haixun 01 picked up the “ping” signal at around 25 degrees south latitude and 101 degrees east longitude, Xinhua said. It has not been established whether the ping is related to the disappeared Flight MH370.

Xinhua further said a Chinese air force plane spotted a number of white floating objects in the search area.

Malaysia said on Saturday it had launched an investigation into the March 8 disappearance of MH370 that would comprise experts from around the world, while the huge hunt for the Boeing 777 airliner intensified in the Indian Ocean.

Authorities have not ruled out mechanical problems as a cause but say the evidence, including the loss of communications, suggests Flight MH370 was deliberately diverted thousands of kilometers (miles) from its scheduled route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

Defense and acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein told a news conference that Australia, China, the United States, the United Kingdom and France had agreed to send representatives to take part in the investigation.

The extensive search and rescue operation has so far included assets from around 26 countries.

Under International Civil Aviation Organisation regulations, the country where the aircraft is registered leads the investigation when the incident takes place in international waters.

A spokesman from the U.N. agency told Reuters that it received official notification of the accident on 28 March, meaning that the investigation was considered officially launched on that date.

Hishammuddin said that the investigation would be made up of three groups: An “airworthiness” group would examine maintenance records, structures and systems; an “operations” group would study flight recorders, operations and meteorology; and a “medical and human factors” group would look into psychology, pathology and survival factors.

The Malaysian government has also set up ministerial committees to oversee everything pertaining to the next of kin of the 239 passengers and crew on board the aircraft, the appointment of the investigation team and the deployment of assets in the search operation.

EXTENSIVE SEARCH CONTINUES

Searchers on Saturday launched the most intensive hunt yet in the southern Indian Ocean, trying to find the plane’s black box recorders before their batteries run out.

Up to 10 military planes, three civilian jets and 11 ships were scouring a 217,000-sq-km (88,000-sq-mile) patch of desolate ocean some 1,700 km (1,060 miles) northwest of Perth near where investigators believe the plane went down a month ago.

“If we haven’t found anything in six weeks we will continue because there are a lot of things in the aircraft that will float,” Retired Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, the head of the Australian agency coordinating the operation, told reporters.

“Eventually I think something will be found that will help us narrow the search area.”

Dozens of flights by a multinational taskforce have so far failed to turn up any trace of the plane.

The Boeing 777 was briefly picked up on military radar on the other side of Malaysia and analysis of subsequent hourly electronic “handshakes” exchanged with a satellite led investigators to conclude the plane crashed far off the west Australian coast hours later.

SONAR SEARCH

Sonar equipment on two ships joining the search may help find the plane’s black box voice and data recorders that are key to unlocking what happened on the flight. The black box is equipped with a locator beacon that transmits “pings” when underwater, but its batteries may only last 30 days.

Australian authorities said the so-called Towed Pinger Locator will be pulled behind navy ship HMAS Ocean Shield, searching a converging course on a 240-km (150-mile) track with British hydrographic survey ship HMS Echo.

Experts have warned the Towed Pinger Locator may be of little use unless investigators can get a much better idea of exactly where the plane went into the water, because its limited range and the slow speed at which it must be pulled behind the ship mean it cannot cover large areas of ocean quickly.

“I won’t even call it an area. What we are doing is we are tracking down the best estimate of the course that the aircraft was on,” U.S. Navy Captain Mark Matthews told Reuters. “It takes a couple of days on each leg so its a slow-going search.”

Britain is also sending HMS Tireless, a Trafalgar-class nuclear submarine with sonar capabilities, and a Malaysian frigate was due to arrive in the search area on Saturday.

Malaysian authorities have faced heavy criticism, particularly from China, for mismanaging the search and holding back information. Most of the 227 passengers were Chinese.



News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

Drive charged in fatal hit and run, police…

The NYPD has arrested a man they say is responsible for a fatal hit and run in Manhattan last weekend. Doohee Cho, 33, was hit…

Local

Mayor de Blasio raises minimum wage for some…

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed an executive order Tuesday morning that will raise the minimum wage for workers employed by private companies that receive more…

National

3 myths about the working poor

Linda Tirado works to debunk some common stereotypes about the working poor in her new book, "Hand to Mouth."

Money

Lawsuit funding advances: friend or foe?

Reporter was commissioned to write this in-depth article Many plaintiffs awaiting resolution of their lawsuit or legal claim often find themselves in a tricky financial…

Going Out

Which NYC restaurant lost its three-star Michelin rating?

A record 73 restaurants in New York City collected coveted Michelin stars on Tuesday as a mix of trendy spots and fine-dining stalwarts underscored the…

Entertainment

Interview: Metro chats with filmmaker Meir Kalmanson, man…

A New York filmmaker hands out smiles to its residents.

Television

TV watch list, Tuesday, Sept. 30: 'Selfie,' 'Utopia'…

'Selfie' This modern day take on the "My Fair Lady" story stars John Cho in the Henry Higgins role. Perhaps instead of "the rain in…

Music

Can't-miss weekend events continue to attract the masses

Reporter was commissioned to write this in-depth article Earlier this summer, the Firefly Music Festival drew crowds of tens of thousands of people to Dover, Delaware.…

MLB

Mets 2014 report card

The Mets wrapped up their eight straight season without a playoff appearance last weekend. Needless to say, they fell a bit short of general manager…

NFL

NFL Power Rankings: Cowboys, Packers, Ravens, Chargers climb

NFL Power Rankings: Cowboys, Packers, Ravens, Chargers climb

NFL

Ryan Quigley making a big impact for Jets…

Ryan Quigley, now in his second year as the Jets punter, had an exceptional afternoon with six punts for an average of 51.7 yards per punt.

NFL

3 positives to take from Jets loss to…

The Jets suffered another loss Sunday — 24-17 to the Lions — but the reason why it hurts so much for Jets fans is that…

Style

Products that support breast cancer awareness and research

Asics GT-1000, $100 Asics’ third pink collection in collaboration with Christina Applegate’s Right Action for Women includes this pink-accented version of its best-selling GT-1000 3…

Wellbeing

Dr. Marisa Weiss: Where we stand on breast…

As an oncologist and a survivor herself, Dr. Marisa Weiss knows the urgency felt by those diagnosed with breast cancer. Genetic testing has accelerated the…

Wellbeing

Bees' stingers hold new hope for cancer cure

A promising new lead in the search for a cancer cure has turned up in a place that most people naturally avoid. A team from…

Home

Emily Henderson on small space design

Design expert Emily Henderson shows us how to upgrade our cramped quarters.