‘Anti-Bloomberg’ bill passes in Mississippi

soda ban
A N.Y. state Supreme Court judge ruled that the city cannot enforce the controversial drink size ban, just a day before it had been set to go into effect.

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has passed a law people are calling the “anti-Bloomberg bill,” CNN reports, prohibiting city or local governments from enacting regulations like the controversial drink size ban in New York City.

The ban had been set to go into effect last week, but was struck down in the 11th hour by a judge who ruled that it excessively expanded the powers of the Department of Health beyond precedent.

According to a recent Central for Disease Control report, Mississippi has the highest rate of obesity in the country, at 34.9 percent.

New York state’s obesity rate was 24.5 percent as of 2011.

But Bryant reportedly told CNN that obesity among children in his state has dropped 13.3 percent between 2005 and 2011.

The New York Post recently depicted Mayor Michael Bloomberg as Mary Poppins hovering over the city, a play on his “Nanny Bloomberg” nickname.

The mayor responded favorably to the drawing.

“That’s one of the most wonderful cartoons I’ve ever seen,” he said.

He reiterated his stance in a speech following the judge’s ruling, insisting he was doing what was best for the people in his city.

“I take that as a great badge of honor,” the mayor insisted. “I can’t think of anything I like [more]. It says we’re trying to do something: Save lives.”

The Mississippi lawmaker who sponsored the bill, state Sen. Tony Smith, is also a restaurant owner.

“If the market demands that I serve a more healthy food, I’ll do that to meet the market demand,” Smith said. “But … why should I risk my capital, my hard work, my efforts that I’ve put into build a restaurant on the thinking of what a government official thinks?”

Follow Danielle Tcholakian on Twitter @danielleiat



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Comments

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  1. Obesity is up for three reasons. One, the taxpayers subsidize food production. Two, the taxpayers subsidize food consumption. Three, the taxpayers (and premium payers in group health plans in “community rating” states) subsidize medical care for obesity-related health problems. End these subsidies, and you will end obesity. Indeed the only valid argument in favor of the soda ban is that “the cost to treat obesity-related illnesses later in life represent a burden on the system” – but that is ONLY because lefties like Bloomberg have made it so! Simply undo the system! Let people drink what they want and pay their own medical bills!