Metropolitik: And the moms fight on

After a week in which Republicans turned Democrats’ rhetorical “War on Women” around on them by shifting the debate from the right-wing’s ubiquitous anti-women policies into a battle over lefties’ alleged disdain for working mothers, we thought maybe this election battle had played itself out.

We weren’t the only ones. Slate’s Dave Weigel called it for the talking point: “The ‘War on Women’ is over,” he wrote. (Online, at least, women appeared thankful for that.) The Washington Post was less jury, more judge: “Dear media: Stop playing along with fake controversies,” they instructed.

It’s almost as if they’d never been through a presidential campaign before!

Alas, neither side of this fracas was inclined to obey the orders. Yes, much like our other legacy entanglements — think: War on Terror, War on Drugs, War in Afghanistan — this so-called war seems intent on playing itself out indefinitely.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner went on ABC yesterday to attack Mitt Romney’s argument that the president’s economic policies have unfairly affected women. “It’s a ridiculous argument,” he said. “It’s been largely debunked.”

See, Romney keeps saying that “92.3 percent of the job losses during the Obama years have been women.” This is sort of true, but also not at all: While many have lost their jobs in the recession, Obama’s stimulus saved many more. And while Republicans oppose any and all stimulus, more government spending could have saved still more. (And if it’s true that the government reaction to the 2008 mortgage crisis spawned “The Obama Great Failed Recovery,” as conservative blog Legal Insurrection and many others allege, what was the GOP counteroption? Tax cuts for the rich? Deregulation? Would those help women?)

Even Fox News Sunday saw a discrepancy in the Romney claim. Host Chris Wallace called the figure a “little bit of an accounting trick,” saying “all the independent fact-finders have said it’s misleading.” Romney adviser Ed Gillespie shot back: Those were “liberal economists.”

The big get in the mommy skirmishes came this weekend from NBC’s Chris Hayes, who found video of Romney arguing in January that poor stay-at-home moms ought to get a job so they can “have the dignity of work.” This paints a telling contrast from the campaign’s manufactured outrage after unaffiliated Democrat operative Hilary Rosen said Ann Romney had not “worked a day in her life.” The Romney camp mobilized, using the incident to paint Dems as anti-mom; Romney adviser Eric Fehrnstrom called it the “‘kill Ann’ strategy.”

So which is it, Romneys? Is “stay-at-home mom” a respectful signifier? Or does it imply a lack of dignity?

Our moms are waiting.

For more political commentary, follow Brayden Simms on Twitter @metropolitik.



News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

Drive charged in fatal hit and run, police…

The NYPD has arrested a man they say is responsible for a fatal hit and run in Manhattan last weekend. Doohee Cho, 33, was hit…

Local

Mayor de Blasio raises minimum wage for some…

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed an executive order Tuesday morning that will raise the minimum wage for workers employed by private companies that receive more…

National

3 myths about the working poor

Linda Tirado works to debunk some common stereotypes about the working poor in her new book, "Hand to Mouth."

Money

Lawsuit funding advances: friend or foe?

Reporter was commissioned to write this in-depth article Many plaintiffs awaiting resolution of their lawsuit or legal claim often find themselves in a tricky financial…

Going Out

Which NYC restaurant lost its three-star Michelin rating?

A record 73 restaurants in New York City collected coveted Michelin stars on Tuesday as a mix of trendy spots and fine-dining stalwarts underscored the…

Entertainment

Interview: Metro chats with filmmaker Meir Kalmanson, man…

A New York filmmaker hands out smiles to its residents.

Television

TV watch list, Tuesday, Sept. 30: 'Selfie,' 'Utopia'…

'Selfie' This modern day take on the "My Fair Lady" story stars John Cho in the Henry Higgins role. Perhaps instead of "the rain in…

Music

Can't-miss weekend events continue to attract the masses

Reporter was commissioned to write this in-depth article Earlier this summer, the Firefly Music Festival drew crowds of tens of thousands of people to Dover, Delaware.…

NFL

NFL Power Rankings: Cowboys, Packers, Ravens, Chargers climb

NFL Power Rankings: Cowboys, Packers, Ravens, Chargers climb

NFL

Ryan Quigley making a big impact for Jets…

Ryan Quigley, now in his second year as the Jets punter, had an exceptional afternoon with six punts for an average of 51.7 yards per punt.

NFL

3 positives to take from Jets loss to…

The Jets suffered another loss Sunday — 24-17 to the Lions — but the reason why it hurts so much for Jets fans is that…

MLB

Joe Girardi not confident David Robertson will return…

David Robertson was as seamless as anyone could be replacing Mariano Rivera as he converted 39 saves, with a 3.08 ERA and 96 strikeouts in 64 1/3 innings.

Wellbeing

Bees' stingers hold new hope for cancer cure

A promising new lead in the search for a cancer cure has turned up in a place that most people naturally avoid. A team from…

Home

Emily Henderson on small space design

Design expert Emily Henderson shows us how to upgrade our cramped quarters.

Home

Emily Henderson's pet-friendly style tips

Design expert Emily Henderson shows us to live with pets in style.

Education

At one university, college students get to study…

We all know that college students love coffee. Widener University is taking that love to a new level with its Cultivation to Cup program. Inside…