Drafting a quarterback is a risky investment for an NFL team. But of the 55 quarterbacks drafted over the last five years, most have seen some playing time -- with at least 16 starting a game at some point in 2015 and many more in seasons prior.

If a quarterback is drafted, one of three outcomes usually follows: he'll get an opportunity to play on a bad team (Andrew Luck in 2012), he'll be a long-term backup on a good team (Jimmy Garoppolo in 2014) or he'll bounce from team to team as a stopgap (Brandon Weeden in 2012).

The Eagles are more likely than not picking a quarterback in April's draft. Whether it will be a first, third or late round pick is yet to be seen, as is whether he will be a starter on a bad team, or a backup on a good team.

With the NFL combine around the corner, all eyes will be on the quarterbacks when they work out for scouts and coaches Friday. Here's a little context, looking back at the success rate of some of the more notable quarterbacks selected over the past five drafts.

It's clear from looking just five years into the past, every draft class (save for the exception of 2013) has contributed at least one solid, franchise quarterback.

2011

Best: Cam Newton (No. 1), Andy Dalton (No. 35)

Middle of the road: Colin Kaepernick (No. 36), Tyrod Taylor (No. 180)

Worst: Jake Locker (No. 8), Blaine Gabbert (No. 10), Christian Ponder (No. 12)

2012

Best: Andrew Luck (No. 1), Russell Wilson (No. 75)

Middle of the road: Robert Griffin III (No. 2), Brock Osweiler (No. 57), Nick Foles (No. 88), Kirk Cousins (No. 102)

Worst: Ryan Tannehill (No. 8), Brandon Weeden (No. 22)

2013

Best: EJ Manuel (No. 16)

Middle of the road: Geno Smith (No, 39)

Worst: Matt Barkley (No. 98)

2014

Best: Teddy Bridgewater (No. 32), Derek Carr (No 36)

Middle of the road: Blake Bortles (No. 3)

Worst: Johnny Manziel (No. 22), Zach Mettenberher (No. 178)

2015

Best: Jameis Winston (No. 1), Marcus Mariota (No. 2)

Worst: Too early to tell